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Inverness, Holm Mills Road, Holm Mills

Watermill (Period Unassigned)

Site Name Inverness, Holm Mills Road, Holm Mills

Classification Watermill (Period Unassigned)

Alternative Name(s) River Ness

Canmore ID 277966

Site Number NH64SE 364

NGR NH 65488 43128

NGR Description Centred NH 65488 43128

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/277966

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
Canmore Disclaimer. © Copyright and database right 2019.

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Digital Images

Administrative Areas

  • Council Highland
  • Parish Inverness And Bona
  • Former Region Highland
  • Former District Inverness
  • Former County Inverness-shire

Archaeology Notes

NH64SE 364.00 centred 65488 43128

Holm Mills [NAT]

OS 1:10,560 map, 1959.

Mill [NAT]

OS 1:10,000 map, 1984.

NH64SE 364.01 NH 64994 43078 to NH 65412 43151 Lade

NH64SE 364.02 NH 65581 43151 to NH 65711 43164 Tail-race (lade)

Activities

Construction (1798)

Circa 1798. The building, now a display area, is single storey with five bays of roof trusses about 30 ft span making a width of 150 ft. The roof trusses are timber, some with iron tiebars, and vary in form from bay to bay. They are supported on timber beams carried on cast-iron columns of 6 1/2 –7 1/2 in. diameter, probably made in the early-19th century.

R Paxton and J Shipway, 2007.

Publication Account (2007)

Holm Mills, Inverness

(Institute Civil Engineers Historic Engineering Works no. HEW 2533)

This building, the former spinning and weaving factory of the Pringle family and now a retail outlet of James Pringle Weavers, is located within a group of buildings between the B862 road and the Ness on the south side of the town. The factory ‘was established about 1798 and is the oldest woollen factory in the north of Scotland. It is worked by both water and steam’ (Groome, Ordnance Gazetteer, 1901).

The building, now a display area, is single storey with five bays of roof trusses about 30 ft span making a width of 150 ft. The roof trusses are timber, some with iron tiebars, and vary in form from bay to bay. They are supported on timber beams carried on cast-iron columns of 6 1/2 - 7 1/2

in. diameter, probably made in the early-19th century. The 17 columns of the central line are spaced about 6 ft apart making the building about 110 ft long. As the centres of the trusses and columns do not correspond, the building appears crudely constructed. The ceiling height is 8 1/4 ft and some shafting and mill machinery are still in place on the trusses.

R Paxton and J Shipway, 2007.

Reproduced from 'Civil Engineering heritage: Scotland - Highlands and Islands' with kind permission from Thomas Telford Publishers.

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