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Glasgow, Forth And Clyde Canal, Maryhill Locks

Lock(S) (Post Medieval)

Site Name Glasgow, Forth And Clyde Canal, Maryhill Locks

Classification Lock(S) (Post Medieval)

Alternative Name(s) Locks 21 To 25

Canmore ID 44153

Site Number NS56NE 84

NGR NS 56390 69072

NGR Description NS 5625 6903 to NS 5651 6898

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/44153

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
Canmore Disclaimer. © Copyright and database right 2019.

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Administrative Areas

  • Council Glasgow, City Of
  • Parish Glasgow (City Of Glasgow)
  • Former Region Strathclyde
  • Former District City Of Glasgow
  • Former County Lanarkshire

Archaeology Notes

NS56NE 84 56390 69072 (NS 5625 6903 to NS 5651 6898)

See also NS56NE 217.00.

For adjacent Kelvin Aqueduct and Kelvin Dry Dock, see NS56NE 85 and NS56NE 213 respectively.

For adjacent public house (White House Inn), see NS56NE 1634.

Maryhill Locks. Built 1787-90 for the Forth and Clyde Canal. R. Whitworth, engineer. A flight of five locks at the western end of the summit level of the canal. Between the locks are large oval basins with masonry walls, and there is a fifth basin between the bottom lock and the aqueduct NS56NE 85.

J R Hume 1974.

To the W of Maryhill Road, an elegant flight of five locks by Robert Whitworth (1787-90) at the W end of the summit level of the canal. Between each one, large oval basins with masonry walls.

E Williamson, A Riches and M Higgs 1990.

Irregularly sized oval basins link the five locks of this series. The locks are numbered 21 to 25.

G Hutton 1993.

There are five locks in this flight, which is known as the Maryhill Locks. Numbered 21 to 25, they assist the canal in its descent into the Kelvin valley, and each lock is connected with its neighbour by an oval basin. The purpose of the basins was to permit boats to pass each other whilst going through the series of locks.

Currently, both Locks 21 and 22 have been completely restored. The western end of the 'summit' canal water level is marked by Lock 21, details about this feature being recorded on an oval plaque.

H Brown 1997.

Architecture Notes

NS56NE 84 56390 69072 (from NS 5625 6903 to NS 5651 6898)

The locks, numbered 21 to 25, are linked by oval basins. The dry dock and slipway of the old Kelvin Dock (NS56NE 213) are situated on the N side of the basin existing between Locks 22 and 23. While the whole flight of locks and the dry dock have undergone partial restoration, the two locks at the top of the flight, Locks 21 and 22, have been re-gated and restored.

The Forth and Clyde Canal Guidebook 1991.

Irregularly sized oval basins link the five locks of this series. The locks are numbered 21 to 25.

G Hutton 1993.

There are five locks in this flight, which is known as the Maryhill Locks. Numbered 21 to 25, they assist the canal in its descent into the Kelvin valley, and each lock is connected with its neighbour by an oval basin. The purpose of the basins was to permit boats to pass each other whilst going through the series of locks.

Currently, both Locks 21 and 22 have been completely restored. The western end of the 'summit' canal water level is marked by Lock 21, details about this feature being recorded on an oval plaque.

H Brown 1997.

This flight of locks and area take their name from a struggling heiress, Mary Hill, whose fortunes took a turn for the better when it was proposed to run the canal through her Gairbraid Estate. Her stipulated condition for feuing the ground for the village was that it should take her name. This village then became a thriving community with a number of typical canl-side industries, including a boatyard and timber yard.

G Hutton 1998.

Activities

Construction (1787 - 1790)

Built by William Gibb and John Muir same time as Kelvin Aqueduct and Forth and Clyde Canal at this point.

Watching Brief (23 January 2007 - 1 February 2007)

NS 5639 6907 Archaeological monitoring took place between 23 January-1 February 2007 during repairs to three areas of canal wall in the vicinity of Locks 21 and 22 of the Forth and Clyde Canal. In Area 1 (the N bank to the E of Lock 21) the repairs saw the removal of 32m of concrete and poor quality masonry. Behind the removed masonry and concrete the puddle clay lining of the canal was revealed. To the W of the repairs the

canal walls were in fine condition, comprising six courses of c1m thick dressed blond sandstone with a 420mm-high red sandstone cope on top. A possible ash bedding layer for a cobbled surface was identified in the area, as was a later concrete surface that was related to a garage built in the 1960s.

In Area 2 (the S bank to the E of Lock 21) the repair work saw the removal of 28m of concrete (c14m) and poor masonry (c14m). To the W of this area was a stretch of wall that had been recently repaired with gabion baskets and this was retained. Once the concrete and poor masonry was removed the puddle clay lining could be seen behind it. Evidence of a recent service cut and a historic repair (in the form of wooden piles) was also

revealed.

In Area 3 (part the N part of the W wall of the basin between Locks 21 and 22) the repairs saw the reduction and repair of an unspecified length of the basin wall. A section of the masonry had collapsed and required repair. In this area a c14m stretch of concrete had replaced the original red sandstone cope. Below the concrete was a double course of horizontally tooled blond sandstone that was sat on five courses of stippled blond sandstone. The collapsed area (c 4m long x 1m high) was in these builds.

Archive to be deposited with RCAHMS.

Funder: British Waterways Scotland.

Project (2007)

This project was undertaken to input site information listed in 'Civil engineering heritage: Scotland - Lowlands and Borders' by R Paxton and J Shipway, 2007.

Publication Account (2007)

This impressive flight of five locks, Locks 21 to 25, dropping the canal 40 ft from its summit level to immediately

east of Kelvin Aqueduct, was built at the same time by Gibb & Muir, also under Whitworth’s direction. The lock

dimensions basically conformed to Smeaton’s practice. As at Camelon they were designed singly so as to ‘treasure up’ at least a lock full of water in the basin between each lock enough to accommodate more than one vessel for flexibility in use.

On the north bank off the basin below Lock 22 is Kelvin Dock, a small dry dock which for many years was used for shipbuilding and repairs.

R Paxton and J Shipway 2007

Reproduced from 'Civil Engineering heritage: Scotland - Lowlands and Borders' with kind permission of Thomas Telford Publishers.

Archaeological Evaluation (24 March 2009 - 25 March 2009)

A programme of archaeological works was undertaken by AOC Archaeology including monitoring of ground-breaking works associated with new bench facilities and evaluation and historic building recording in advance of landscaping, as part of the regeneration works at Maryhill Locks, Glasgow, on the Forth and Clyde Canal. The works consisted of the monitoring of five short trenches for bench foundations and the excavation of four evaluation trenches in advance of landscaping works. An historic building recording exercise was also carried out on the northern and eastern boundary walls of the Kevin Docks and of the upstanding remains in their vicinity in advance of landscaping.

Remains of two or three phases of slipway construction, of probable 20th century date, associated with the Kelvin Docks were recorded. A concrete platform was also identified in the northeast corner of the site.

Information from AOC Archaeology Group

References

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