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Kintyre: Skelmorlie Measured Mile, Upper Firth Of Clyde

Steamship (20th Century)

Site Name Kintyre: Skelmorlie Measured Mile, Upper Firth Of Clyde

Classification Steamship (20th Century)

Alternative Name(s) Inner Clyde Estuary; Wemyss Bay; Wemyss Point; Kintyre

Canmore ID 102741

Site Number NS16NE 8002

NGR NS 18739 69740

Datum WGS84 - Lat/Long

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/102741

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
Canmore Disclaimer. © Copyright and database right 2020.

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Digital Images

Administrative Areas

  • Council Inverclyde
  • Parish Maritime - Inverclyde
  • Former Region Strathclyde
  • Former District Maritime
  • Former County Not Applicable

Archaeology Notes

NS16NE 8002 1873 6974

N55 53.2 W4 53.9167

NLO: Wemyss Point [name: NS 198 701]

Skelmorlie [name: NS 192 675].

Formerly entered as Site no. 9375.

(Transits illustrated).

G Ridley 1984.

Quality of fix = EDM

Evidence = Echo sounder

Horizontal Datum = OGB

General water depth = 38

Orientation of keel/wreck = 100280

Circumstances of Loss Details

-----------------------------

The steamship KINTYRE sank following a collision with the SS MAORI. The KINTYRE had an iron hull, a single funnel and 2 masts, and was launched on 10 June 1868.

Report by P Moir, 3 August 1980.

Surveying Details

-----------------------------

The wreck's position is given as 55 53 42N, 004 54 54W by D Mcentee,

28 April 1982. The wreck was located in the approximate listed position in a general depth of 40 metres. It lies, with the hull virtually intact and some superstructure aft of the forward hold, on a steep sandy slope. The bow is shoalest part, where the divers gauge depth was 36 metres.

Report by P J Moir, 21 April 1982.

18 February 1987. The site was examined on 29 June 1986 at 55 53 12N, 004 53 55W. The least echosounder depth was 34 in a general depth of 33 to 43 metres. No scouring was observed. The side scan sonar indicated a height of 4 metres, and length of 50 metres (164 feet). The vessel is lying on a orientation of 100/280 degrees, and is upright on a steeply sloping seabed.

Report by HMS HECLA.

Hydrographic Office, 1995.

(Classified as iron steamship, in ballast: date of loss cited as 18 September 1907). Kintyre: this vessel was in collision and sank off 100 yds offshore, opposite Wemyss Point (Maori). Capt. McKechnie.

Registration: Glasgow. Built 1868. 314grt. Length: 55m. Beam: 7m.

(Location of loss cited as N55 53.2 W4 53.97).

I G Whittaker 1998.

Material reported under RoW amnesty (2001):

A1331 telegraph top, kettle, gauge, porthole: from seabed

A2789 flange and pipe, wooden ladder and rungs: from seabed

A3063 'oiler'.

NMRS, MS/829/35.

Activities

Loss (18 September 1907)

(Classified as iron steamship, in ballast: date of loss cited as 18 September 1907). Kintyre: this vessel was in collision and sank off 100 yds offshore, opposite Wemyss Point (Maori). Capt. McKechnie.

Registration: Glasgow. Built 1868. 314grt. Length: 55m. Beam: 7m.

(Location of loss cited as N55 53.2 W4 53.97).

I G Whittaker 1998.

Evidence Of Loss (1984)

(Transits illustrated).

G Ridley 1984.

Evidence Of Loss (1995)

Quality of fix = EDM

Evidence = Echo sounder

Horizontal Datum = OGB

General water depth = 38

Orientation of keel/wreck = 100280

Circumstances of Loss Details

-----------------------------

The steamship KINTYRE sank following a collision with the SS MAORI. The KINTYRE had an iron hull, a single funnel and 2 masts, and was launched on 10 June 1868.

Report by P Moir, 3 August 1980.

Surveying Details

-----------------------------

The wreck's position is given as 55 53 42N, 004 54 54W by D Mcentee,

28 April 1982. The wreck was located in the approximate listed position in a general depth of 40 metres. It lies, with the hull virtually intact and some superstructure aft of the forward hold, on a steep sandy slope. The bow is shoalest part, where the divers gauge depth was 36 metres.

Report by P J Moir, 21 April 1982.

18 February 1987. The site was examined on 29 June 1986 at 55 53 12N, 004 53 55W. The least echosounder depth was 34 in a general depth of 33 to 43 metres. No scouring was observed. The side scan sonar indicated a height of 4 metres, and length of 50 metres (164 feet). The vessel is lying on a orientation of 100/280 degrees, and is upright on a steeply sloping seabed.

Report by HMS HECLA.

Hydrographic Office, 1995.

Evidence Of Loss (2001)

Material reported under RoW amnesty (2001):

A1331 telegraph top, kettle, gauge, porthole: from seabed

A2789 flange and pipe, wooden ladder and rungs: from seabed

A3063 'oiler'.

NMRS, MS/829/35.

Reference (2011)

Whittaker ID : 1932

Name : KINTYRE

Latitude : 555312

Longitude : 45358

Date Built : 1868

Registration : GLASGOW

Type : SS (IRON)

Tonnage : 314

Tonnage Code : G

Length : 55

Beam : 7

Draught : 3m

Position : Exact Position

Loss Day : 18

Loss Month : 9

Loss Year : 1907

Comment : Collision and sunk 100 yds offshore opposite Wemyss Pt (MAORI). Capt. MacKechnie

Cargo : BALLAST

Reference (19 April 2012)

UKHO Identifier : 004099

Feature Class : Wreck

Wreck Category : Non-dangerous wreck

State : LIVE

Classification : Unclassified

Position (Lat/long) : 55.88667,-4.89861

Horizontal Datum : ORDNANCE SURVEY OF GREAT BRITAIN (1936)

WGS84 Position (Lat/long) : 55.88659,-4.89979

WGS84 Origin : 3-D Cartesian Shift (BW)

Previous Position : 55.88750,-4.90000

Position Method : Electronic Distance Measuring System

Position Quality : Surveyed

Position Accuracy : 25.0

Depth : 34.0

Depth Method : Found by echo-sounder

Depth Quality : Least depth known

Water Depth : 38

Water Level Effect : Always under water/submerged

Vertical Datum : Lowest Astronomical Tide

Name : KINTYRE

Type : SS

Flag : BRITISH

Length : 56.4

Beam : 7.0

Draught : 3.7

Sonar Length : 50.0

Shadow Height : 4.0

Orientation : 100.0

Tonnage : 314

Tonnage Type : Gross

Date Sunk : 18/09/1907

Scour Depth : 0.0

Contact Description : Entire wreck

Original Sensor : Reported Sinking

Last Sensor : Diver Sighting

Original Detection Year : 1907

Last Detection Year : 2000

Desk Based Assessment (27 November 2014)

Name: Kintyre

Position: 55.88659, -4.89979

Basis for Identification: Identification is based on known losses in this area and features of the wreck remains.

Shipbuilder: Robertson & Co, Greenock.

Build Date: 1868

Loss Date 1907

Vessel type: Steamship

Surviving Features and Condition: UKHO (1982, description attributed to P. Moir): Wreck lies, with hull virtually intact and some superstructure aft of forward hold, on steep sand slope. Bow lies at the shallowest depth (c. 36m).

UKHO (1986 using trisponder): Least e/s depth 34m in general depth of 33-43mtrs. No scour. Dual Control Side Scan Sonar recorded remains 4m in height, length 50mtrs. Lying 100/280deg, upright and on a steeply sloping seabed.

UKHO (2000, description attributed to ‘Diver Magazine’, April) Plating fallen away from hull. Hull more intact on port side. Wreckage embedded in seafloor. Large gash caused by collision on starboard side just behind engine room. Roof of engine room missing giving good view of large boiler.

Moir and Crawford (2004): Wreck largely intact, apart from an area aft of the engine room on the starboard side. Clipper bow extant. Divers have noted deterioration since 1980s. Telegraph and other features recovered from wreck. Features including toilets and winch noted.

Nicolson (2006): Features noted include the bow of the vessel, three toilets around the midships area.

Scubadave1701 (2009,video uploaded to you tube in 2009): Show a short clip of the hull of the wreck with framing visible, plating has fallen away.

Scobie (2013): At the bow only the ribs survive. The plating has fallen away in this area. Wheelhouse no longer extant. Wreck has deteriorated down to deck level. Split at fore end of aft hold. The stern end has broken up further, and possibly slid deeper. Brass toilet fittings noted. However brass cannon, the ship’s bell, portholes and brass rims, passageway edges and toilets have all been removed since the 1980s (Scobie pers. comm 2015).

Etchells (2014): Dived stern of the vessel and bollard protruding from seabed in c. 50m depth toward end of stern. Noted considerable structural remains associated with the vessel. Spine of the wreck noted.

Sewell (pers. comm. 2015). Last dived 2013/2014. The shape of the wreck can clearly be made out. The bow is prominent and well defined. Toilets are visible amidships. The wreck stands proud of the seabed and is quite intact.

Moir and Crawford (pers. comm 2015): The bow and the deck are silting up. Stern has broken up. Plates have fallen away but frame survives. Bowsprit present.

Seabed and type and marine environment: Sandy. Tidal area, reasonably fast currents run around the wreck. Wreck lies on a steep slope (c. 30- 60m). the UKHO record the general depth of the seabed in this area at 38m. Surface sediments of Sand and Mud recorded by the Institute of Geological Sciences (Deegan et. al. 1973)

Information from Sally Evans (Cotswold Archaeology), 27/11/2014.

Desk Based Assessment (27 November 2014)

The Kintyre is recorded to have been built in 1868 by Robertson & Co. Greenock. The vessel was an iron steamship, with a clipper bow. The vessel is recorded by divers as being substantially intact, with gash from collision visible. Characterising Scotland's Marine Archaeolological Resource database places this wreck c. 70m to the east of the UKHO position for the live wreck of the St Oran. The Canmore position is in accordance with the UKHO position

Information from Sally Evans (Cotswold Archaeology), 27/11/2014.

Project (October 2014 - April 2015)

The maritime archaeology of the Clyde has been identified as a focus for a major study of human interaction with the river through time by the RCAHMS following on from recommendations by the Scottish Archaeological Research Framework (ScARF). Source to

Sea has been developed as the long-term research programme, of which the research into human connections with the River Clyde forms part. This project has comprised a study of the surviving shipwreck heritage of Clyde-built vessels lost within the Clyde estuary and Firth of Clyde.

This project has collated information from a range of sources and has enhanced knowledge of Clyde-built wrecks within the Clyde. In particular information from recreational divers has proved invaluable and has been the source of detailed information about the current condition of many Clyde-built wrecks, useful for on-going management. A number of wrecks previously recorded as of unknown identity in the RCAHMS database were positively identified during the project and more accurate positional information was established for a number of other wrecks. Additionally, the project identified a potentially significant wreck (Margaret Niven) the remains of which were not previously recorded. This project has also identified a number of other potentially significant wrecks within the Clyde, which reflect both its unique contributions to world-wide shipbuilding and local connections. These wrecks include paddle steamers (Lapwing and Princess of Wales), Clyde Puffers (e.g. Margaret Niven), steam-yachts with military connections (HMS Breda), a dredger (Greenock) and an 18th-century West Indiaman (Lady Margaret). Numerous other wrecks have been identified by this project, and all display some degree of significance.

Information from Sally Evans (Cotswold Archaeology) April 2015

References

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