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Lossiemouth, Covesea Skerries Lighthouse

Lighthouse (19th Century)

Site Name Lossiemouth, Covesea Skerries Lighthouse

Classification Lighthouse (19th Century)

Alternative Name(s) Halliman's Reef; Halliman's Scars; Moray Firth

Canmore ID 16732

Site Number NJ27SW 20

NGR NJ 20375 71273

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/16732

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
Canmore Disclaimer. © Copyright and database right 2018.

Digital Images

Administrative Areas

  • Council Moray
  • Parish Drainie
  • Former Region Grampian
  • Former District Moray
  • Former County Morayshire

Archaeology Notes

NJ27SW 20.00 20375 71273

Covesea Skerries Lighthouse

(Revolving white with a red sector) [NAT]

OS (GIS) AIB, May 2006.

NJ27SW 20.01 NJ 20368 71258 Principal Keeper's Cottage

NJ27SW 20.02 NJ 20360 71268 Assistant Keeper's Cottage

NJ27SW 20.03 NJ 20432 71200 Steading

(Location cited as NJ 204 713). Covesea Skerries lighthouse. Established 1846; engineer Alan Stevenson. A tall circular tower with a corbelled machicolated parapet and a circular lantern with a domed roof on a semicircular single-storey base. The Egyptian-style keepers' houses are unspoiled.

J R Hume 1977

This lighthouse was built in response to repeated demands (from 1835 onwards); a pyramid of iron pillars was erected on Halliman's Scars in 1845 and the mainland light of Covesea Skerries in 1846. The (surrounding) high walls that were originally built for shelter were lowered in 1907.

R W Munro 1979.

This lighthouse was automated in 1984 and is now in use as a holiday home.

K Allardyce and E M Hood 1986

Activities

Construction (1846)

Light established in 1846.

K Allardyce 1998

Modification (1984)

Automated in 1984.

K Allardyce 1998

Publication Account (2007)

Covesea Skerries Lighthouse

(Historic Engineering Works no. HEW 2529)

Following the loss of 16 vessels during a storm in the Moray Firth in November 1826 applications were made to the government for lights to be established at Covesea Skerries and Tarbat Ness but it was two decades before Covesea Skerries, one of three lighthouses on the Moray Firth, the

others being Cromarty and Chanonry, became operational in 1846. All three were designed by Alan Stevenson and Covesea Skerries was built by James Smith. The stone tower is about 118 ft high with the spiral access stair supported between the external wall and a central hollow shaft for the weights that drove the lamp machinery.

In 1845 a cast-iron beacon, based on the concept of Robert Stevenson’s at Carr Beacon in 1821 in Civil Engineering Heritage Scotland – Lowlands and Borders (7-12) but about 40 ft tall, was erected offshore to mark Halliman Skerries (see engraving). It is still in service (NJ 2140 7225).

R Paxton and J Shipway 2007

Reproduced from 'Civil Engineering heritage: Scotland - Highlands and Islands' with kind permission from Thomas Telford Publishers.

Publication Account (2007)

government for lights to be established at Covesea Skerries

Covesea Skerries Lighthouse

(Historic Engineering Works no. HEW 2529)

Following the loss of 16 vessels during a storm in the Moray Firth in November 1826 applications were made to the and Tarbat Ness but it was two decades before Covesea Skerries, one of three lighthouses on the Moray Firth, the others being Cromarty and Chanonry, became operational

in 1846. All thre e were designed by Alan Stevenson and Covesea Skerries was built by James Smith. The stone tower is about 118 ft high with the spiral access stair supported between the external wall and a central hollow shaft for the weights that drove the lamp machinery.

R Paxton and J Shipway 2007

Reproduced from 'Civil Engineering heritage: Scotland - Highlands and Islands' with kind permission from Thomas Telford Publishers.

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