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Chatelherault Country Park, Chatelherault Hunting Lodge And Ornamental Gardens

Estate (18th Century), Garden (18th Century), Kennels (18th Century), Lodge (18th Century)

Site Name Chatelherault Country Park, Chatelherault Hunting Lodge And Ornamental Gardens

Classification Estate (18th Century), Garden (18th Century), Kennels (18th Century), Lodge (18th Century)

Alternative Name(s) Hamilton High Parks Estate; Interpretation Visitor Centre

Canmore ID 110505

Site Number NS75SW 27

NGR NS 73644 53930

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/110505

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
Canmore Disclaimer. © Copyright and database right 2018.

Digital Images

Administrative Areas

  • Council South Lanarkshire
  • Parish Hamilton (South Lanarkshire)
  • Former Region Strathclyde
  • Former District Hamilton
  • Former County Lanarkshire

Archaeology Notes

NS75SW 27.00 73644 53930

See Architecture

NS75SW 27.01 NS 737 539 Trial Excavations

Architecture Notes

NS75SW 27.00 73644 53930

NMRS REFERENCE

ARCHITECT: William Adam 1731-44 West wing interior burnt 1944

Thomas Clayton c.1743 - plasterwork

Archibald Chessels, wright - cleaning floors in east jamb 1753 William Edgar 1735 - joiner work

George Anderson - finishing and setting up marble chimneypieces 1753/4

Built as a hunting lodge for James, fifth Duke of Hamilton.

Opened to the public along with part of the High Parks estate in lieu of death duties, 30 September 1987, following ten-year restoration from ruin at total cost of £7m. First phase of conversion to visitor centre, involving enclosure of the open kennel courtyard by a pyramid roof, carried out by Brooke Millar Peden 1996. Roof of natural slate, covering prefabricated steel roof trusses and rafters, supported by slim columns. A new main doorway created in S elevation garden wall.

RIAS 1996; Prospect 1987

James Stirling Maxwell Fairlie MSS

The other house is the keeper's house and kennels which William Adam built for the Duke of Hamilton in Cadzow Park. To the keeper's house and kennels he added a large banqueting room very large and lofty with fine plaster decorations and a large panel at the end enclosing a life size portrait horse on which the Duke won some famous race. I suppose this room was intended for luncheon or tea for large shooting parties. This building is well worth a visit and I should like to take you over to it some day. It has a lovely garden and a terrace overlooking the steep and lovely gorge of the Avon. The buildings were designed as a feature on the sky-line as seen from Hamilton Palace from which they were about a mile and a half distant. This curious establishment is called Chatelherault from the Duke's french title. It appears in Petruvius Scoticus but without details of the large room.

The painting was removed for safety during the war.

Simpson and Brown photographs

Box 3 album no 29

1983 exterior views with scaffolding

Simpson and Brown photographs

Box 6 album no 91

1988 eight details, mainly interior

NMRS - notes on building ( D5/LA(P))

EXTERNAL REFERENCE

Scottish Record Office

Building of 'the dog kennel' [Chatelherault] Account included in report of claims made by John Adam, Architect, on behalf of himself and his father, William, against the Duke of Hamilton. It amounts to #2,392 and covers the years 1731-1743. Other accounts indicate that Robert Mein was paid as mason-foreman.

1770 Fea of Clestrain GD31/554

Hamilton Archives 449/4/2&3

2 accounts for finishing & setting up marble chimneypieces

Activities

Publication Account (2006)

In the early 18th century the principle feature of the Hamilton Palace policies was the mile long avenue leading from the palace to the ravine of the River Avon with the ruins of Cadzow Castle beyond. William Adam was commissioned by the 5th Duke of Hamilton to build an eyecatcher to terminate the vista. The resulting building combined both the practical 'Dogg Kennell’ with the more frivolous ‘Banqueting House’; its Palladian style is handled with a baroque bravura. Adam’s design appears to be inspired by a variety of interesting contemporary fashionable buildings including Queen’s College, Oxford and the great country houses of Wilton and Houghton. He adapted the plan form of a French Hotel to his unique requirements.

The name recalls the French dukedom given to the Earl of Arran, the Duke's ancestor, by Henri II in 1549. Work was begun in 1731, but Thomas Clayton did not complete the plasterwork of the banqueting house until 1742.

It was opened to the public, along with a part of the High Parks estate, on 30 September 1987, following a ten-year restoration from ruin at total cost of £7m, having been accepted by the government in lieu of death duties. The first phase of conversion to a visitor centre involved the enclosure of the open kennel courtyard by a pyramid roof, carried out by Brooke Millar Peden in 1996. The roof is of natural slate, covering prefabricated steel roof trusses and rafters, and supported by slim columns. A new main doorway was created in the south elevation garden wall.

Information from 'The Royal Commission on Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland: Field Guide 2006'.

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