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All our staffed properties, sites and offices, including the HES Archives and Library, are currently closed, but we’re working on plans to gradually reopen. In the meantime, you can access our services online. Find out more.

Scheduled Website Maintenance 14/07/20 00:00 – 04:00GMT – There will be periods of time during this window when this website will be unavailable.

Archaeology InSites

Age of Stone
Age of Bronze
Age of Iron
Age of Invasion
Age of Warriors
Age of Worship
Age of Kings
Age of Clans
Age of Industry
Age of Leisure
Age of War
This Age

Age of Iron

The Age of Iron brought about increased fortification and large tribal centres dominated the land. This age saw the rise of a class of elites who inhabited hillforts or immense architectural structures such as monumental roundhouses, including crannogs, brochs and wheelhouses.

Dumbuck Crannog - West Dunbartonshire

This complex timber structure, the last of our Iron Age sites, has survived the test of time thanks to the preserving conditions of its muddy and watery location on the banks of the River Clyde. Dumbuck Crannog is an archaeological site with two stories: the first is that of the people who built it; the second is that of the people who excavated it. The latter of which sparked controversy and disagreement among the archaeological community of the day...

Hoga Ness broch - Unst, Shetland

Hoga Ness broch, a ruined Iron Age stone tower surrounded by dramatic earthworks can be found on a windswept peninsula on Unst, the most northerly of the Shetland Islands.