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In recognition of the essential restrictions and measures imposed by the Scottish and UK Governments, we have closed all sites, depots and offices, including the HES Archives and Library, with immediate effect. Read our latest statement on Coronavirus (COVID-19).

Archaeology InSites

Age of Stone
Age of Bronze
Age of Iron
Age of Invasion
Age of Warriors
Age of Worship
Age of Kings
Age of Clans
Age of Industry
Age of Leisure
Age of War
This Age

Age of Stone

The Age of Stone ventures into the depths of prehistory to explore the Palaeolithic, Mesolithic and Neolithic. From scatters of stone tools and traces of domestic houses, to chambered cairns and rock art; this age gave rise to monumental architecture and the adoption of farming, and has left a lasting legacy on Scotland’s landscape to this day.

Howburn Farm - Biggar, South Lanarkshire

You would be forgiven for driving along the A702 in South Lanarkshire on your way home to Biggar without knowing you were in a landscape containing some of Scotland’s earliest archaeological evidence. Although the surrounding countryside is now rich agricultural farmland, archaeologists have discovered that people were living here as early as 12,000 years ago during the last ice age. That’s around 360 generations ago. Archaeologists call this period the Late Upper Palaeolithic.