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Field Visit

Date 3 July 1956

Event ID 926196

Category Recording

Type Field Visit

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/event/926196

This fort is situated at a height of 1,127 feet [347m] O.D. at the head of the valley of the Allt nan Gleannan on a prominent knoll which rises from the crest bordering Glen Nevis to the W. It stands at a distance of 1,100 yards W of the old graveyard called Ach nan Con that lies on the right bank of the Water of Nevis, and at a height of 1,059 feet above it. While the approach from the E is thus difficult, those from other directions are more moderate. The fort, which conforms in shape to the sloping summit of the knoll, is of irregular sub-rectangular form, the longer axis running from NE to SW. It measures about 150 feet in length by a maximum of 90 feet in breadth within the massive ruin of a stone wall spread to as much as 50 feet in width in which considerable lumps of vitrifaction appear. The entrance is in the NW corner. The interior slopes down from the NE, the upper half being divided by a scarp into two platforms and the lower following without interruption to the ruined wall. A ruinous internal division crossing the fort from N to S appears to be secondary, and possibly of comparatively recent date. A smaller and less exalted knoll rises immediately N of the fort. The remains of a stone wall originate near the E extremity of this and run NW, W and SW over the crest of the knoll and so on to the SW toe of the eminence on which the fort stands. The line can be followed thence round the S and SE flanks of the latter feature until it fades away as the steepness of the face increases. This wall possibly represents an outer line of defence such as was observed for example at Torr Dhuin, Auchteraw, Invernesshire [NH30NW 1].

Visited by RCAHMS (RWF) 3 July 1956

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