Accessibility

Font Size

100% 150% 200%

Background Colour

Default Contrast
Close Reset

Seabegs Wood

Fortlet (Roman)

Site Name Seabegs Wood

Classification Fortlet (Roman)

Alternative Name(s) Antonine Wall; Dalnair

Canmore ID 46788

Site Number NS87NW 10

NGR NS 81166 79206

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/46788

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
Canmore Disclaimer. © Copyright and database right 2018.

Digital Images

Administrative Areas

  • Council Falkirk
  • Parish Falkirk
  • Former Region Central
  • Former District Falkirk
  • Former County Stirlingshire

Archaeology Notes

NS87NW 10 81166 79206

See also NS87NW 9.

NS 812 792. A Roman fortlet attached to the Antonine Wall was discovered in June 1977 on the farm of Dalnair, at the west end of Seabegs Wood, in a field from which numerous fragments of Roman pottery have been recovered in recent years. The Antonine Wall makes a northward detour to include the plateau on which the fortlet is set, and itself forms the north rampart. The excavation, carried out under the auspices of the Hunterian Museum, revealed that the fortlet measured 21.8m N-S by 18m E-W internally and was defended by a rampart set on a stone base 3m wide and by two ditches. Parts of the east and south rampart base had been removed by ploughing. Examination of the NE and NW corners of the fortlet established that it and the Wall were of one build. The ditches on the east side were identified as being 3m (inner) and 1.6m wide, but they merged together and terminated close to the SE corner of the fortlet. The western ditches are assumed to have done the same. The lack of cover for the south rampart may be ascribed to the proximity of the Military Way, whose presumed line was sectioned as it emerged from Seabegs Wood. Only scattered cobbles and a possible drainage ditch were observed. There were gateways in both the north and south walls of the fortlet, each 3m wide and flanked by post holes. A roadway of rammed pebbles and small stones passed through the south gate to join the Military Way, and a similar road passed through the north gate, but examination failed to reveal evidence of its having crossed the Antonine Wall ditch. There was evidence of a second phase of occupation which involved changes which may have included the blocking of the north gate, but there was no evidence of re-cutting of the ditches. The interior of the fortlet was not examined.

L J F Keppie and J J Walker 1977; 1979; R Goodburn 1978.

NS 812 792. Further small finds from this fortlet include numerous pottery sherds and ten red-clay gaming balls.

DES (Small finds) 1977.

NS 8116 7921. There is no surface evidence of this fortlet in an arable field.

Site surveyed at 1:2500

Visited by OS (MJF) 24 May 1980.

NS 815 793 A watching brief was undertaken in March 2001 during minor excavations within the Scheduled area of the Antonine Wall, just to the E of Seabegs Roman fort, just to the S of the military way. This small-scale excavation revealed nothing of archaeological significance.

Sponsor: Historic Scotland

D Murray and G Ewart 2001

NS 8118 7924 Archaeological monitoring was undertaken in March 2003 during excavations intended to improve drainage of the ditch at the W end of the well-preserved section of the Antonine Wall. No features or finds of archaeological significance were uncovered.

Archive to be deposited in the NMRS.

Sponsor: HS

G Ewart 2003.

The length of the Antonine Wall (NS87NW 32.00) between Dalnair and Seabegs Wood [NS 8095 7908 to NS 8118 7922] has been scheduled, together with Dalnair temporary camp (NS87NW 9) and Seabegs fortlet (NS87NW 10).

Information from Historic Scotland, scheduling document dated 10 February 2005.

Activities

Aerial Photography (1971)

Casual Observation (June 1977)

NS 812 792. A Roman fortlet attached to the Antonine Wall was discovered in June 1977 on the farm of Dalnair, at the west end of Seabegs Wood, in a field from which numerous fragments of Roman pottery have been recovered in recent years. The Antonine Wall makes a northward detour to include the plateau on which the fortlet is set, and itself forms the north rampart.

Excavation (1977 - 1978)

NS 812 792. A Roman fortlet attached to the Antonine Wall was discovered in June 1977 on the farm of Dalnair, at the west end of Seabegs Wood, in a field from which numerous fragments of Roman pottery have been recovered in recent years. The Antonine Wall makes a northward detour to include the plateau on which the fortlet is set, and itself forms the north rampart. The excavation, carried out under the auspices of the Hunterian Museum, revealed that the fortlet measured 21.8m N-S by 18m E-W internally and was defended by a rampart set on a stone base 3m wide and by two ditches. Parts of the east and south rampart base had been removed by ploughing. Examination of the NE and NW corners of the fortlet established that it and the Wall were of one build. The ditches on the east side were identified as being 3m (inner) and 1.6m wide, but they merged together and terminated close to the SE corner of the fortlet. The western ditches are assumed to have done the same. The lack of cover for the south rampart may be ascribed to the proximity of the Military Way, whose presumed line was sectioned as it emerged from Seabegs Wood. Only scattered cobbles and a possible drainage ditch were observed. There were gateways in both the north and south walls of the fortlet, each 3m wide and flanked by post holes. A roadway of rammed pebbles and small stones passed through the south gate to join the Military Way, and a similar road passed through the north gate, but examination failed to reveal evidence of its having crossed the Antonine Wall ditch. There was evidence of a second phase of occupation which involved changes which may have included the blocking of the north gate, but there was no evidence of re-cutting of the ditches. The interior of the fortlet was not examined.

L J F Keppie and J J Walker 1977; 1979; R Goodburn 1978.

Field Visit (24 May 1980)

NS 8116 7921. There is no surface evidence of this fortlet in an arable field.

Site surveyed at 1:2500

Visited by OS (MJF) 24 May 1980.

Ground Survey (24 May 1980)

NS 8116 7921. There is no surface evidence of this fortlet in an arable field.

Site surveyed at 1:2500

Visited by OS (MJF) 24 May 1980.

Aerial Photography (1981)

Aerial Photography (1984)

Aerial Photography (2 February 1997)

Aerial Photography (4 March 1997)

Watching Brief (28 March 2001 - 29 March 2001)

NS 815 793 A watching brief was undertaken by Kirkdale Archaeology of a small excavation within the scheduled area of the Antonine Wall, just to the E of Seabegs Roman Fort, on the 29th of March, 2001. The aim was to dig a small hole, to take a signpost, in a location already chosen by Historic Scotland just to the S of the Military Way (Figs. 1 & 2). The Antonine Wall survives here, for a short distance, as an impressive upstanding monument, with the wall, ditch and its’ upcast, and the Military Way all clearly recognisable. This excavation revealed nothing of archaeological significance.

Sponsor: Historic Scotland

D Murray and G Ewart 2001

Kirkdale Archaeology

Watching Brief (March 2003)

NS 8118 7924 Archaeological monitoring was undertaken in March 2003 during excavations intended to improve drainage of the ditch at the W end of the well-preserved section of the Antonine Wall. No features or finds of archaeological significance were uncovered.

Archive to be deposited in the NMRS.

Sponsor: HS

G Ewart 2003.

Ground Survey (27 June 2006)

Aerial Photography (8 September 2006)

References

MyCanmore Image Contributions


Contribute an Image

MyCanmore Text Contributions