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Clydebank, Duntocher

Bath House (Roman)

Site Name Clydebank, Duntocher

Classification Bath House (Roman)

Alternative Name(s) Golden Hill; Duntocher Parish Church

Canmore ID 43317

Site Number NS47SE 6

NGR NS 4941 7276

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/43317

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
Canmore Disclaimer. © Copyright and database right 2019.

Administrative Areas

  • Council West Dunbartonshire
  • Parish Old Kilpatrick (Clydebank)
  • Former Region Strathclyde
  • Former District Clydebank
  • Former County Dunbartonshire

Archaeology Notes

NS47SE 6 4941 7276.

(NS 4941 7276) Roman Bath House (R) (site of)

OS 50" map (1970)

The bath-house of Duntocher fort was discovered in 1775 while trench digging on 'the declivity' of Golden Hill, over 100 yds NW of the fort itself. Knox (1785) gives a detailed eye-witness account of the discovery. This is supplemented by Camden (1806) who may be referring to the original discovery or another, intended, excavation some three years later (c.1778). Albeit, sketches show the exact position of the bath-house, with three apartments and two apses, in relation to the nearby church and fort. Further finds are recorded, the only one of which still accountable is a stone female statuette pipe-support, in the Hunterian Museum. Macdonald places all this early history in detailed context.

G Macdonald 1934; R Stuart 1852

There are no signs of this antiquity, the site of which is now situated in a public park.

Visited by OS (WMJ) 21 March 1951

NS 494 727. In 1978, a short length of wall and an associated drain, possibly of the bath-house, were uncovered in the War Memorial enclosure of Trinity Parish Church. The wall was 1.38m thick and stood three courses high with a slightly curved drain running under it at right angles. Finds, including Roman brick, flue tiles, concrete and pottery, are in the Central Library, Clydebank.

J Brogan and A A R Henderson 1978; R Goodburn 1979

The site is now mostly occupied by the ornamental gardens of the church War Memorial enclosure.

Visited by OS (JRL) 2 November 1980.

NS 494 728 An archaeological evaluation was undertaken in November 2004 as the line of the Antonine Wall and its associated ditch might cross the SW edge of the site. The Roman fort of Golden Hill Park and its related bathhouse lie directly to the S. A total of 64m2 was investigated by means of evaluation trenches, though test pits were necessary in most areas to reach natural alluvial deposits. Modern made ground was identified to the S of the site, while made ground of 20th-century date and redeposited natural alluvial deposits associated with the burn were revealed in the N and E. No significant archaeological features or deposits were encountered. See also NS47SE 239.

Archive to be deposited in the NMRS.

Sponsor: Stuart McElney.

M Roy 2004

Activities

Antiquarian Observation (1775)

The bath-house of Duntocher fort was discovered in 1775 while trench digging on 'the declivity' of Golden Hill, over 100 yds NW of the fort itself. Knox (1785) gives a detailed eye-witness account of the discovery.

Antiquarian Observation (1778)

This is supplemented by Camden (1806) who may be referring to the original discovery or another, intended, excavation some three years later (c.1778). Albeit, sketches show the exact position of the bath-house, with three apartments and two apses, in relation to the nearby church and fort.

Reference (1934)

Further finds are recorded, the only one of which still accountable is a stone female statuette pipe-support, in the Hunterian Museum. Macdonald places all this early history in detailed context.

G Macdonald 1934; R Stuart 1852

Field Visit (21 March 1951)

There are no signs of this antiquity, the site of which is now situated in a public park.

Visited by OS (WMJ) 21 March 1951

Salvage Record (1978)

NS 494 727. In 1978, a short length of wall and an associated drain, possibly of the bath-house, were uncovered in the War Memorial enclosure of Trinity Parish Church. The wall was 1.38m thick and stood three courses high with a slightly curved drain running under it at right angles. Finds, including Roman brick, flue tiles, concrete and pottery, are in the Central Library, Clydebank.

J Brogan and A A R Henderson 1978; R Goodburn 1979

Field Visit (2 November 1980)

The site is now mostly occupied by the ornamental gardens of the church War Memorial enclosure.

Visited by OS (JRL) 2 November 1980.

Watching Brief (29 May 2012 - 10 August 2012)

Archaeological monitoring was required for Scottish Water Shared Services in support of the sewer repairs at Roman Road, Duntocher. The proposed study area at Duntocher, West Dunbartonshire currently exists as the grounds and car park for the Antonine Sports Centre. This area does not, according to the West of Scotland Archaeology Service and Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland, contain any known archaeological sites. However substantial Roman archaeological remains are present to the immediate East and North. The main monument is the remains of the Golden Hill section of the Antonine wall (Canmore ID 43265) and the Golden Hill Roman Fort, annexe and bathhouse (Canmore ID 43317). In the course of the works extensive areas of made ground and elements of 19th and 20th century structures were encountered to the south of the Duntocher Burn. To the north of the burn additional walls were located, while only short sections of these walls were exposed they may be of earlier origin than the 19th century. No significant archaeological finds were recovered during the course of these works.

Information from Oasis (rathmell1-120674) 26 March 2013

Watching Brief (6 March 2017 - 2 June 2017)

Archaeological works comprising the monitoring of the implementation of access improvement works were carried out at Golden Hill Park Roman fort, annexe, and bathhouse in Duntocher, Clydebank. The access improvement works exposed natural soil profiles or those altered in the 20th century as part of park landscaping. No significant archaeology was discovered during the course of the works.

Information from OASIS ID: rathmell1-286568 (J Durnan) 2017

References

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