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Kirriemuir

Cross Slab (Pictish), Pictish Symbol Stone (Pictish)

Site Name Kirriemuir

Classification Cross Slab (Pictish), Pictish Symbol Stone (Pictish)

Alternative Name(s) Kirriemuir No. 3

Canmore ID 32301

Site Number NO35SE 20.03

NGR NO 3895 5448

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/32301

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
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Administrative Areas

  • Council Angus
  • Parish Kirriemuir
  • Former Region Tayside
  • Former District Angus
  • Former County Angus

EARLY MEDIEVAL CARVED STONES PROJECT

Kirriemuir 3 (St Mary), Angus, Pictish cross-slab fragment

Measurements: H 0.68m, W 0.50m, D 0.12m

Stone type: sandstone

Place of discovery: NO 3895 5448

Present location: Meffan Museum and Gallery, Forfar

Evidence for discovery: found re-used in the foundations of the old parish church when it was demolished in 1787 and taken to the new cemetery.

Present condition: broken top and bottom and worn and face B is missing.

Description

The central portion of a cross-slab, this fragment is carved in relief with incised details. Face A shows a cross, the arms of which extend into the flat-band border, with squared armpits. The cross is filled with interlinked Stafford knots formed of median-incised cords. On either side of the shaft is an entwined serpent with a head at either end of its body, which also has a median incised line.

Face C has a flat-band border incised with square key pattern, which encloses a single panel with a horseman facing left and the legs of another horse above him. The surviving rider is wearing a helmet, circular shield and sword and carrying a spear. A hound is in front of the horse, and there is median-incised knotwork filling the space around the hind-quarters of the horse. Narrow face D bears a panel of median-incised interlace.

Date range: ninth or tenth century.

Primary references: ECMS pt 3, 258-60; RCAHMS 2003.

Desk-based information compiled by A Ritchie 2018

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