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Edinburgh, Leith Walk, Shrub Place Lane, Shrubhill Tramway Workshops And Power Station

Power Station (19th Century), Tram Depot (19th Century)

Site Name Edinburgh, Leith Walk, Shrub Place Lane, Shrubhill Tramway Workshops And Power Station

Classification Power Station (19th Century), Tram Depot (19th Century)

Alternative Name(s) Dryden Street; Pilrig; Shrubhill Omnibus Depot And Garage; Edinburgh Corporation Transport, Tram Museum; Croall And Son

Canmore ID 174942

Site Number NT27NE 849

NGR NT 26306 75159

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/174942

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
© Copyright and database right 2016.

Digital Images

Administrative Areas

  • Council Edinburgh, City Of
  • Parish Edinburgh (Edinburgh, City Of)
  • Former Region Lothian
  • Former District City Of Edinburgh
  • Former County Midlothian

Archaeology Notes

NT27NE 849 26306 75159

For adjacent tramway power standards (in Dryden Street, on feeder route into the rear entrance of the depot), see NT27NE 850.

Works [NAT]

OS 1:1250 map, 1983.

(Location cited as NT 263 572). Shrubhill Tramway Workshops and Power Station, Dryden Street, power station opened 1898. A tall 8-bay, 1-storey and basement ashlar block, 3 wide single-storey bays, and a single-storey, 4-bay rubble block with round-headed windows and 8 circular windows. All these have roof-ridge ventilators. The complex is dominated by an octagonal brick chimney, with decorated top section on a square masonry base. The power station housed the haulage engines for cable-tramway operations.

J R Hume 1976.

Site Management (4 October 2011)

Part of a single storey and basement, 8-bay, factory works, irregular-plan complex of horizontally aligned blocks. Tall ground floor, clerestorey, tall chimney stalk. Red brick and red sandstone ashlar with ashlar or brick margins. Ashlar banding to brick work. (Historic Scotland)

Shrubhill Tramway Workshops and Power Station, Dryden Street, power station opened 1898. A tall 8-bay, 1-storey and basement ashlar block, 3 wide single-storey bays, and a single-storey, 4-bay rubble block with round-headed windows and 8 circular windows. All these have roof-ridge ventilators. The complex is dominated by an octagonal brick chimney, with decorated top section on a square masonry base. The power station housed the haulage engines for cable-tramway operations. (RCAHMS)

Site Management (16 February 2012)

Part of a single storey and basement, 8-bay, factory works, irregular-plan complex of horizontally aligned blocks. Tall ground floor, clerestorey, tall chimney stalk. Red brick and red sandstone ashlar with ashlar or brick margins. Ashlar banding to brick work. (Historic Scotland)

Shrubhill Tramway Workshops and Power Station, Dryden Street, power station opened 1898. A tall 8-bay, 1-storey and basement ashlar block, 3 wide single-storey bays, and a single-storey, 4-bay rubble block with round-headed windows and 8 circular windows. All these have roof-ridge ventilators. The complex is dominated by an octagonal brick chimney, with decorated top section on a square masonry base. The power station housed the haulage engines for cable-tramway operations. (RCAHMS)

Activities

Archaeological Evaluation (16 April 2008 - 17 April 2008)

NT 2630 7515 Work was carried out, 16–17 April 2008, ahead of redevelopment. A desk-based assessment suggested that the first significant historical reference to the site was as a possible site of public executions in the 16th–17th centuries. In the 17th century the area was extensively quarried for mortar sand and in around 1800, Shrub House, a small country house and gardens was erected on the site. Shrub House and its gardens were gradually encroached upon by subsequent developments, including the Edinburgh Street Tramways stables and workshops. The horse-drawn trams were replaced by a cable system in the late 19th century, the development of which included the construction of a number of highly decorated brick buildings. The remainder

of the site, including Shrub House, was demolished in the 1960s to be replaced by offices and sheds for East Lothian Transport.

The earliest recorded deposit was of glacial material, overlain with later deposits of windblown sands. The lack

of windblown material toward the NW end of the site was thought to reflect 17th-century quarrying activity. This

quarrying combined with the natural slope of the area accounts for the drop of over 3m in ground level from the

front to the rear of the site.

Fragmentary sandstone walls were identified toward the centre of the site and these were thought to represent

buildings associated with the Tramway Companys stores and stables, as depicted on the OS map of 1877.

Trenches excavated on the site of the former Shrub House revealed that the structure had been entirely demolished and the site comprehensively levelled. The only structural remains in the trenches relating to buildings erected in the 1970s.

Archive: RCAHMS

Funder: Developer

Kate Bain (Headland Archaeology Ltd), 2008

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