Accessibility

Font Size

100% 150% 200%

Background Colour

Default Contrast
Close Reset

Union Canal, Slamannan Basin And Railway Terminal Yard

Canal Basin (Period Unassigned)

Site Name Union Canal, Slamannan Basin And Railway Terminal Yard

Classification Canal Basin (Period Unassigned)

Alternative Name(s) Causewayend, Canal Basin; Edinburgh And Glasgow Union Canal; Slamannan Railway; Slamannan Dock

Canmore ID 47844

Site Number NS97NE 62.03

NGR NS 96136 76141

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/47844

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
Canmore Disclaimer. © Copyright and database right 2018.

Digital Images

Administrative Areas

  • Council Falkirk
  • Parish Muiravonside
  • Former Region Central
  • Former District Falkirk
  • Former County Stirlingshire

Archaeology Notes

NS97NE 62.03 96136 76141

Location formerly entered as NS 9613 7613.

For former bridge (adjacent to SE) carrying the Slamannan Railway over the canal, see NS97NE 176.

The terminal dock of the Slamannan Railway (LIN 22) is presumably not an original part of the Union Canal, as the railway line was not opened until 1840.

It lies on the SW bank of the canal 170 yds NW of the road from Linlithgow to Slamannan and consists of a basin 150ft square which communicates with the canal through an opening 15ft wide at its narrowest point. The SW side of the basin is formed by a quay of massive stonework, its coping bearing some remains of loading machinery. The grooves in its edge are understood to have been made by pigs of iron being slid down into barges. The NE side and the entrance are also faced with, if not wholly built of, masonry, part of the coping here being made of blocks to which the railway-lines had once been bolted. As far as could be seen under a heavy covering of herbage, the NW and SE sides are of earth.

RCAHMS 1963 (visited 1954).

(Location cited as NS 961 761). Slamannan Railway Terminal Basin, Stirlingshire. This basin, on the SW bank of the Union Canal, was the original terminus of the Slamannan Railway, which was opened in 1840. RCAHMS notes that it 'consists of a basin 150 ft. [45.7m] square, which communicates with the Canal through an opening 15ft [4.6m] wide at its narrowest point. The SW side of the basin is formed by a quay of massive stonework, the coping bearing some remains of loading machinery. The grooves in its edge are understood to have been made by pigs of iron being slid down into barges. The NE side and the entrance are also faced with, if not wholly built of, masonry, part of the coping here being made of blocks to which railway-lines had once been bolted. As far as could be seen under a heavy covering of herbage, the NW and SE sides are of earth.'

RCAHMS 1963 (visited 1954); A Graham 1971.

This basin was the terminus of a railway line from Slammannan, near Airdrie, which was built in 1840.

G Hutton 1993.

This large square basin was the location of transference of coal fom railway transportation to canal barges. As the lines were built jutting out over the basin, coal could be tipped straight into the holds once the doors were opened.

H Brown 1997.

The basin and adjoining railway lines are clearly marked on the 1st edition of the OS 6-inch map (Stirlingshire 1865, sheet XXXI) and on the 2nd edition of the OS 6-inch map (Stirlingshire 1899, sheet XXXISW). The basin is visible on the current edition of the OS 1:10000 map (1989) and on the OS Basic Scale digital map (2000), but the railway line has been dismantled.

Information from RCAHMS (MD), 17 April 2001.

These structures are depicted, but not noted, on the 1987 edition of the OS 1:10,000 map.

Information from RCAHMS (RJCM), 21 February 2006.

Activities

Project (2007)

This project was undertaken to input site information listed in 'Civil engineering heritage: Scotland - Lowlands and Borders' by R Paxton and J Shipway, 2007.

Publication Account (2007)

This basin on the Union Canal at Causewayend, near Linlithgow, was commenced in 1836 and opened in 1840

as a trans-shipment facility between the canal and Slamannan Railway connecting with Glasgow. When the

Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway opened to Haymarket in 1842 the usefulness of the dock was much reduced, particularly after the Slamannan Railway was connected with the Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway in 1843.

The dock was 150 ft square and the railway tracks ran round the sides of the basin with turning points at the

corners to allow the railway wagons to be rotated through 90 degrees. The base of a crane can still be seen. The engineer was John MacNeill, London, and the contractor, Michael Fox (for the eastern end of the railway and probably the dock). The resident engineer was Thomas T. Mitchell.

R Paxton and J Shipway 2007

Reproduced from 'Civil Engineering heritage: Scotland - Lowlands and Borders' with kind permission from Thomas Telford Publishers.

References

MyCanmore Image Contributions


Contribute an Image

MyCanmore Text Contributions