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Watling Lodge

Fortlet (Roman), Frontier Defence (Roman)

Site Name Watling Lodge

Classification Fortlet (Roman), Frontier Defence (Roman)

Alternative Name(s) Falkirk; Tamfourhill

Canmore ID 46783

Site Number NS87NE 7

NGR NS 8627 7978

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/46783

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
Canmore Disclaimer. © Copyright and database right 2018.

Digital Images

Administrative Areas

  • Council Falkirk
  • Parish Falkirk
  • Former Region Central
  • Former District Falkirk
  • Former County Stirlingshire

Archaeology Notes

NS87NE 7 8627 7978

See also NS87NE 52.

(NS 8627 7978) Roman Fortlet (R) (site of)

OS 1:1250map, (1969).

A Roman fortlet, adjoining the south side of the Antonine Wall where the road to Camelon passed through, was discovered in 1894 by M Buchanan. He uncovered parts of the east and south ramparts, these having a stone foundation about 15' broad, and also identified the gateway through the Wall. The site of the fortlet is occupied by the garden of Watling Lodge (G Macdonald 1934).

Excavations made in 1972-4 located the single outer ditch, 2.8m wide and some 1.0m deep, on the west, south, and east sides. This showed the fortlet to measure approximately 18.5m E-W by 15.5m within the rampart, the early MacDonald plan being incorrect (D J Breeze 1972; D R Wilson 1975).

D J Breeze 1975.

Plans, finds and photographs of the 1972-4 excavations are with the National Monuments Record.

DES (RCAHMS) 1979.

There is no surface trace of the fortlet (or the 1972-4 excavations) within the garden area of Watling Lodge.

Visited by OS (JRL) 25 April 1980.

In 1986, three trenches were dug over the area of the road and S defences of the fortlet.

L J F Keppie et al 1995.

(Schedule no. 8453). Scheduled as Antonine Wall, Watling Lodge fortlet.

Information from Historic Scotland, scheduling document dated 23 March 2005.

Activities

Antiquarian Observation (1894)

A Roman fortlet, adjoining the south side of the Antonine Wall where the road to Camelon passed through, was discovered in 1894 by M Buchanan. He uncovered parts of the east and south ramparts, these having a stone foundation about 15' broad, and also identified the gateway through the Wall.

Field Visit (1934)

The site of the fortlet is occupied by the garden of Watling Lodge (G Macdonald 1934).

Aerial Photography (1971)

Excavation (1972 - 1974)

NS87NE 7 8627 7978

A Roman fortlet, adjoining the south side of the Antonine Wall where the road to Camelon passed through, was discovered in 1894 by M Buchanan. He uncovered parts of the east and south ramparts, these having a stone foundation about 15' broad, and also identified the gateway through the Wall. The site of the fortlet is occupied by the garden of Watling Lodge (G Macdonald 1934).

Excavations made in 1972-4 located the single outer ditch, 2.8m wide and some 1.0m deep, on the west, south, and east sides. This showed the fortlet to measure approximately 18.5m E-W by 15.5m within the rampart, the early MacDonald plan being incorrect (D J Breeze 1972; D R Wilson 1975).

D J Breeze 1975.

Plans, finds and photographs of the 1972-4 excavations are with the National Monuments Record.

DES (RCAHMS) 1979.

Photographic Record (1976)

Field Visit (25 April 1980)

There is no surface trace of the fortlet (or the 1972-4 excavations) within the garden area of Watling Lodge.

Visited by OS (JRL) 25 April 1980.

Excavation (1986)

'Watling Lodge (Falkirk p). Roman fortlet. Excavation in advance of roadworks.

Bailey, Geoffrey B

Publication Account (1995)

In 1986, three trenches were dug over the area of the road and S defences of the fortlet.

L J F Keppie et al 1995.

Aerial Photography (4 March 1997)

Excavation (August 2014)

NS 8623 7977 In August 2014 local children excavated a trench on the line of the Roman road issuing from the S gate of the fortlet at Watling Lodge on land adjacent to Tamfourhill Community Centre. Plough marks on the natural clay showed that any Roman features would have been removed by

agricultural activity. At the W end of the trench machine scoops were associated with the creation of the play park in the 1970s.

Funder: Falkirk Community Trust and Tamfourhill Community Centre

Geoff Bailey

(Source: DES)

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