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Castle Knowe

Natural Feature (Period Unknown)

Site Name Castle Knowe

Classification Natural Feature (Period Unknown)

Canmore ID 41231

Site Number NS25SW 5

NGR NS 2036 5081

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/41231

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
Canmore Disclaimer. © Copyright and database right 2018.

Administrative Areas

  • Council North Ayrshire
  • Parish West Kilbride
  • Former Region Strathclyde
  • Former District Cunninghame
  • Former County Ayrshire

Archaeology Notes

NS25SW 5 2036 5081.

(NS 2036 5081) Castle Knowe (NAT) Motte (NR)

OS 1:10000 map (1980)

Castle Knowe is apparently artificial, it is 37 paces in diameter at the base, 7ft 6ins high on one side and 13ft 8ins on the other. Mr R Hunter (proprietor) states that about 1816, there were the appearances of an arch in the centre from N-S; some believe that the mound was erected for the purpose of dispensing justice.

J Smith 1895; Name Book 1856

An oblong cavity was found in the centre of this mound. It extended across the entire top of the mound and was about 6ft or 8ft in width and depth. The walls were of neatly built drystone construction. The interior was filled with fallen earth and stones.

J Lamb 1896

Castle knowe is a sub-circular, grass-covered mound, about 20.0m in diameter across the top, 4.0m. high on the N, and about 2.0m on the S. The S side of the mound has been cut into. There are no traces of foundations or fortifications.

Visited by OS (DS) 10 September 1956

Castle Knowe appears to be predominantly natural. The S half of the mound has been much reduced by cultivation.

Resurveyed at 1:2500.

Visited by OS (JTT) 23 October 1964

Castle Knowe: motte and bailey.

Information from E Talbot letter, 26 May 1974.

In pasture at approximately 32m OD, Castle Knowe (name verified) is of entirely natural appearance, apart from a slight truncation of its S side (? result of excavation - see Lamb).

Rising gently on the S and W, it is distinctive only when approached from the N, and would seem unsuited for defensive adaptation. The significance of Lamb's report cannot be equated with ground evidence, and neither can Talbot's classification.

The farmer at North Kilruskin reports no unusual finds here.

Visited by OS (JRL) 2 December 1982

References

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