Accessibility

Font Size

100% 150% 200%

Background Colour

Default Contrast
Close Reset

Brechin, Brechin Bridge

Road Bridge (13th Century)

Site Name Brechin, Brechin Bridge

Classification Road Bridge (13th Century)

Alternative Name(s) Brechin, River Street, South Esk Bridge; River South Esk; A933

Canmore ID 35778

Site Number NO65NW 60

NGR NO 60441 59263

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/35778

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
© Copyright and database right 2017.

Digital Images

Administrative Areas

  • Council Angus
  • Parish Brechin
  • Former Region Tayside
  • Former District Angus
  • Former County Angus

Archaeology Notes

NO65NW 60 60441 59263

Brechin Bridge [NAT]

OS 1:10,560 map, 1970.

Two arches. South arch gothic (perhaps early 13th century) (on east face) with corbelled parapet. Widened on west side 1786 or shortly thereafter and north arch rebuilt in segmental form. Engineer Alexander Stevens. Rubble-built. Large cutwaters and semi-octagonal buttresses. Several references to repairs in the late 17th - early 18th centuries. HBD No. 140

(Location cited as NO 604 593). South Esk Bridge, 13th century (south arch), widened 1786 when north arch rebuilt, engineer Alexander Steven.

J R Hume 1977.

(Formerly scheduled as Brechin Bridge). Descheduled.

Information from Historic Scotland, Certificate of Exclusion from Schedule dated 9 October 2001.

This bridge carries the A933 public road over the River South Esk on the S side of Brechin (NO56SE 40).

The location assigned to this record identifies the apparent midpoint of the structure. The available map evidence indicates that it extends from NO c. 60437 59286 to NO c. 60444 59247.

Information from RCAHMS (RJCM), 7 June 2006.

Activities

Modification (1787)

North arch collapsed 18th century, replaced 1787.

Modification (1787)

Noth arch collapse replaced.

Publication Account (2007)

The first bridge to span South Esk at Brechin is thought to date from ca.1220. In ca.1469 it was replaced by a masonry bridge of two spans, but only the south arch is

still in service, now carrying the A933 road. The north arch fell during the 18th century and was replaced in 1787 with a segmental arch built by [Alexander]Stevens. The cost of the bridge was £350.

R Paxton and J Shipway 2007b

Reproduced from 'Civil Engineering heritage: Scotland - Highlands and Islands' with kind permission of Thomas Telford Publishers.

Photographic Survey (27 April 2011)

Photographed for the Listed Building Area Survey.

2011.

Publication Account (2013)

Oldest bridge in Angus, two spans in c1469, were widened in 1786 and north arch rebuilt by Alexander Stevens after a collapse.

M Watson, 2013

References

MyCanmore Image Contributions


Contribute an Image

MyCanmore Text Contributions