Accessibility

Font Size

100% 150% 200%

Background Colour

Default Contrast
Close Reset

Carlungie

Settlement (Period Unassigned), Souterrain (Prehistoric), Unidentified Pottery (Roman)

Site Name Carlungie

Classification Settlement (Period Unassigned), Souterrain (Prehistoric), Unidentified Pottery (Roman)

Alternative Name(s) Carlungie I; Carlungie Earth House

Canmore ID 34535

Site Number NO53NW 14

NGR NO 51117 35972

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/34535

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
© Copyright and database right 2017.

Digital Images

Administrative Areas

  • Council Angus
  • Parish Monikie
  • Former Region Tayside
  • Former District Angus
  • Former County Angus

Archaeology Notes

NO53NW 14 5110 3597.

(NO 5110 3597) Souterrain (NR)

OS 6" map (1969)

A souterrain (Carlungie I) was associated settlement discovered on 17th October 1949 in the same field as Carlungie II (NO53SW 24) and excavated by Wainwright in the summers of 1950 and 1951.

The excavation showed that the trench for the souterrain was dug out and that the surface huts were built on the upcast.

The souterrain, one of the longest known, is 140' long and had four separate entrances. The paved passages average about 7' in width, the corbelled walls being of boulders and split flags. The surviving walling suggested an internal height of at least 6', and when the roofing slabs were in place they must have protruded above ground for 2' or more, eliminating the theory of concealment. The excavation suggested, and scientific analysis of the soil went some way to proving, that this had been a byre for cattle or sheep.

A contemporary settlement consisting of at least 8 huts was identified. Seven of the huts were built of boulders and opened onto a well-paved courtyard partly fenced by upright flags. The 8th hut appeared to be timber built, five post-holes being identified. The evidence suggested that the souterrain had been deliberately and carefully dismantled and filled up as soon as it went out of use, with no break in time nor any change of inhabitants. A cup-and-ring marked stone was found in the filling. A change also took place in the settlement, the courtyard and part of the souterrain being overlaid with paving, and a paved building 18' long and 12' wide, possibly a byre, being built over part of the settlement and another hut being built over two of the earlier ones.

The only dateable find was a Roman amphora, lying in fragments on the paved floor of one of the earlier huts, but the accumulated evidence suggests that the occupation fell between 50 AD and 450 AD and that the souterrain was demolished a little later than 200 AD but before 250 AD.

F T Wainwright 1953; 1963

A small wall-sherd of plain Samian ware collected as a surface find from Carlungie souterrain is now in Dundee Museum (Acc No 1987-186).

A Zealand 1988

NO 5135/5136 and NO 5034 A copper alloy ball with a hole pierced in one end, 3.5cm in diameter, was discovered in the vicinity of a souterrain in the Carlungie/Ardestie area, as a surface find. It was brought in as a verbal enquiry to Montrose Museum in 1994 and to Glasgow Museums in January 1995. It was retained by the finder. Glasgow Museums Enquiry Number 1306.

R Benvie 1995

Activities

Excavation (1949 - 1951)

A souterrain (Carlungie I) was associated settlement discovered on 17th October 1949 in the same field as Carlungie II (NO53SW 24) and excavated by Wainwright in the summers of 1950 and 1951.

The excavation showed that the trench for the souterrain was dug out and that the surface huts were built on the upcast.

The souterrain, one of the longest known, is 140' long and had four separate entrances. The paved passages average about 7' in width, the corbelled walls being of boulders and split flags. The surviving walling suggested an internal height of at least 6', and when the roofing slabs were in place they must have protruded above ground for 2' or more, eliminating the theory of concealment. The excavation suggested, and scientific analysis of the soil went some way to proving, that this had been a byre for cattle or sheep.

A contemporary settlement consisting of at least 8 huts was identified. Seven of the huts were built of boulders and opened onto a well-paved courtyard partly fenced by upright flags. The 8th hut appeared to be timber built, five post-holes being identified. The evidence suggested that the souterrain had been deliberately and carefully dismantled and filled up as soon as it went out of use, with no break in time nor any change of inhabitants. A cup-and-ring marked stone was found in the filling. A change also took place in the settlement, the courtyard and part of the souterrain being overlaid with paving, and a paved building 18' long and 12' wide, possibly a byre, being built over part of the settlement and another hut being built over two of the earlier ones.

The only dateable find was a Roman amphora, lying in fragments on the paved floor of one of the earlier huts, but the accumulated evidence suggests that the occupation fell between 50 AD and 450 AD and that the souterrain was demolished a little later than 200 AD but before 250 AD.

F T Wainwright 1953; 1963

Aerial Photography (September 1970)

Oblique aerial photographs of Carlungie souterrain, Angus, taken by John Dewar in September 1970.

Watching Brief (17 March 2008)

NO 5111 3597 A watching brief was maintained on 17 March 2008 during repair work on two main passages, Souterrain A (mostly N/S aligned) and Souterrain B (E/W aligned). A is shorter than B. The area requiring work was part of the E side wall of Souterrain A, just N of where Souterrain B crosses it. A short stretch of this wall had fallen, blocking the passage and this was to be removed and the wall replaced.

At the N limit of the trench, where it reached the edge of the area of collapse, the E wall of Souterrain A could be seen in section. It stood 1.1m high, c15 courses, was a single stone thick, with a vertical W face and irregular E face.

Archive: RCAHMS

Funder: Historic Scotland

Sarah Hogg (Kirkdale Archaeology), 2008

References

MyCanmore Image Contributions


Contribute an Image

MyCanmore Text Contributions