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Inchture, Station

Railway Station (19-20th Century)

Site Name Inchture, Station

Classification Railway Station (19-20th Century)

Alternative Name(s) Inchture Station

Canmore ID 167350

Site Number NO22NE 47

NGR NO 2869 2648

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/167350

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
Canmore Disclaimer. © Copyright and database right 2020.

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Administrative Areas

  • Council Perth And Kinross
  • Parish Inchture
  • Former Region Tayside
  • Former District Perth And Kinross
  • Former County Perthshire

Archaeology Notes

NO22NE 47 2869 2648

Station (disused) [NAT]

OS 1:10,000 map, 1992.

(Location cited as NO 287 265). Inchture Station, built c. 1847 for the Dundee and Perth Railway. Formerly a two-platform through station, with the main office on the down platform in a one-storey and attic rubble building on an irregular plan, with a bow window facing the track. Similar to Errol Station (NO22SE 31).

J R Hume 1977.

Inchture Station. This intermediate station on the Dundee - Perth line of the former Caledonian Rly was also the junction station for what was apparently a short branch to Inchture Village It was opened (by the Dundee and Perth Rly) on 24 May 1847, and closed to regular passenger traffic on 11 June 1956. The main line remains in regular scheduled use.

Information from RCAHMS (RJCM), 31 August 2000.

R V J Butt 1995.

Activities

Publication Account (2013)

STATIONS ON THE DUNDEE

AND PERTH RAILWAY

The flat Carse of Gowrie was bisected in 1847 by the Dundee and Perth Railway, taking a direct route rather than conveniencing the various local

communities. So the stations became little nuclei in their own right, starting with signalman’s houses at level crossings, to observe road and rail traffic, modelled on toll houses and similar to those on the Dundee and Arbroath railway and then a signal box of c1890.

From Inchture station a branch line in 1849 connected the two miles to the actual Inchture village at Crossgates, and beyond to a brickworks. A

similar branch from Errol to Inchmichael got as far as forming a deep cutting that is now taken by a road because track was never laid there.

M Watsin, 2013

References

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