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Swan: Duart Point, Sound Of Mull

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Dr Colin Martin (left) and Jane Griffiths with a wooden panelled door (DP00/146) on a lifting-frame and covered in wet towels. Secure on a padded flatbed trolley, it is being transported from the wreck-site for initial processing. (Edward Martin)
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Measuring a spot-height with a calibrated digital depth-gauge and vertical scale. (Colin Martin)
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Determining the angle of hull planking near the mainmast-step using the instrument shown in DP_C153. (Colin Martin)
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An archaeologist detaches a finds identifying label to be bagged with its nominated find. (Colin Martin)
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Excavation-tool tray containing triangular markers, a photographic scale, bags filled with lead shot for holding down fragile items during excavation, rolled bandages and formica sheets for consolidating fragile items for lifting, a spatula, polythene bags, and clothes-pegs. Bagged finds are pegged to the bungee cords stretched across the tray for security. (Colin Martin)
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Excavating by hand under water. A longitudinal trench 30cm deep is created by hand fanning, spoil being pulled to the excavator’s rear. The natural angle of repose—here around 45º—creates a running section which reveals the stratigraphy. The trench can be continuously advanced as required, and the hand-fanning technique can be applied vigorously or gently according to need. (Colin Martin)
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Excavating by hand under water. A longitudinal trench 30cm deep is created by hand fanning, spoil being pulled to the excavator’s rear. The natural angle of repose—here around 45º—creates a running section which reveals the stratigraphy. The trench can be continuously advanced as required, and the hand-fanning technique can be applied vigorously or gently according to need. (Colin Martin)
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Drawing features with the aid of a double-strung 1m frame. (Edward Martin)
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Drawing features with the aid of a double-strung 1m frame. (Colin Martin)
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Drawing features with the aid of a double-strung 1m frame. (Colin Martin)
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Drawing structural timbers controlled by a 1m frame. (Colin Martin)
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The 1m drawing-frame in use, positioned against a stretched tape datum. (Colin Martin)
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The 1m drawing-frame in use, positioned against a stretched tape datum. (Colin Martin)
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The levelled 1m drawing-frame in use. Note the floating plumb-bob or ‘tulip’. (Colin Martin)
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A combination of grids, stretched tapes, and floating plumb-bobs ensures accurate survey. (Colin Martin)
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Adjusting the height of one of the legs to level the grid. (Colin Martin)
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On the sea-bed a diver attaches a lifting bag to the 5m scaffold grid for its final positioning. (Colin Martin)
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Preparing the two 5m scaffold grids for the wreck survey. The right hand one is being carried to the boat for transport to the site. (Paula Martin)
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Transferring the level from BM 12094 to the datum level at the wreck-site. (Colin Martin)
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Establishing a temporary datum-point with a scale pole and supporting tripod pushed into the sand. (Edward Martin)
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Outside face of a snaphaunce pistol lock-plate (DP92/DG11) by George Turner of Edinburgh. Scale in millimetres. (Colin Martin)
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Brian Hession (left) and Graham Scott place the wooden gun-carriage (DP00/013) associated with Gun 8 (DP00/203) in a temporary wet storage tank. (Edward Martin)
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An archaeologist examines the inverted wooden gun-carriage (DP00/013) associated with Gun 8 (DP00/203) after excavation. (Colin Martin)
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An archaeologist examines the inverted wooden gun-carriage (DP00/013) associated with Gun 8 (DP00/203) after excavation. (Colin Martin)
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