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Gorrenberry Tower

Tower House (Medieval)

Site Name Gorrenberry Tower

Classification Tower House (Medieval)

Canmore ID 67917

Site Number NY49NE 6

NGR NY 4635 9729

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/67917

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
Canmore Disclaimer. © Copyright and database right 2020.

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Administrative Areas

  • Council Scottish Borders, The
  • Parish Castleton
  • Former Region Borders
  • Former District Roxburgh
  • Former County Roxburghshire

Archaeology Notes

NY49NE 6 4635 9729.

(NY 4635 9729) Gorrenberry Tower (NR) (site of)

OS 6" map (1962)

Goranberry Tower stood near the source of the Hermitage Water, about two miles above the castle (NY49NE 5); it belonged to the Elliots. Remains of the tower existed until within the last thirty years, when they were demolished to build farm offices.

A Jeffrey 1864

No structural remains of a tower can now be seen, but at the published site there is a slight mound, rectangular on plan, and measuring about 11.0m E-W by 4.5m transversely. Numerous small field enclosures which lie adjacent may indicate that this was the site of a farmhouse rather than a tower. Local enquiries failed to confirm the existence of a tower.

Visited by OS (JLD) 27 September 1960

Previous field report confirmed. The name "Gorrenberry Tower" is known locally.

Visited by OS (DWR) 23 March 1972

Activities

Field Visit (May 2011)

The NMRS records that Gorrenberry Tower stood near the source of the Hermitage Water, about two miles above the castle (NY49NE 5); it belonged to the Elliots. Remains of the tower existed until the early to mid 19th century, when they were demolished to build farm offices. No structural remains of a tower were visible when the site was visited in 1960, but a slight mound, rectangular in plan, and measuring about 11.0m east-west by 4.5m transversely was observed. It was suggested at the time of the visit that numerous small field enclosures which lie adjacent may indicate that this was the site of a farmhouse rather than a tower. Local enquiries failed to confirm the existence of a tower.

Field survey recorded some buried wall remains. A single wall c.5m in length, 1m width and 0.3m high ran in a northeast to south-west direction and at its northern end a small mound of stones was recorded, presumably resulting from the destruction of the tower. The remains survive in poor condition and are covered by grass. They lie on a natural

platform which overlooks the river and has good views up and down the valley. Parts of the field boundary surrounding the castle, and visible on the First Edition Ordnance Survey Map remain upstanding, although the northern part of this boundary where it reaches the Gorrenberry Burn has been reused and with addition of some walls built from breeze blocks now forms a sheep pen area.

Information from Oasis (cfaarcha1-102504) 16 January 2014

Sbc Note

Visibility: This was the site of an archaeological monument, which may no longer be visible.

Information from Scottish Borders Council

References

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