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Walton

Pictish Symbol Stone (Pictish)

Site Name Walton

Classification Pictish Symbol Stone (Pictish)

Alternative Name(s) Crawford Priory Estate; Cupar

Canmore ID 31171

Site Number NO30NE 1

NGR NO 363 096

NGR Description NO c. 363 096

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/31171

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
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Administrative Areas

  • Council Fife
  • Parish Cults
  • Former Region Fife
  • Former District North East Fife
  • Former County Fife

EARLY MEDIEVAL CARVED STONES PROJECT (7 September 2016)

Walton, Fife, carved stone

Measurements: H 0.31m, W 0.31m, D 0.12m

Stone type: sandstone

Place of discovery: NO c363 098

Present location: uncertain, Crawford Priory now ruinous. Plaster cast in National Museums Scotland (X.IB 175).

Evidence for discovery: found on Walton Farm in the nineteenth century and taken to Crawford Priory. John Abercromby presented the cast to NMAS in April 1894.

Present condition:

Description

This fragment appears to have been trimmed for re-use. It is carved in both incision and relief but the designs are incomplete. Incised is the head of an eagle with typically hooked beak, facing right. Below its beak is a design carved in relief: circular with an inner decorated ring, the outer band is in relief. Thomas likened it to a Donside terret, and Fraser to the head of a tuning fork symbol. The Ordnance Survey recorded that, when the cast was examined in NMAS in 1971, R B K Stevenson expressed doubts about the authenticity of the stone itself.

Date: seventh century?

References: ECMS pt 3, 344; Thomas 1963, 46, pl 2; Fraser 2008, no 86.

Compiled by A Ritchie 2016

EARLY MEDIEVAL CARVED STONES PROJECT

Walton, Fife, carved stone

Measurements: H 0.31m, W 0.31m, D 0.12m

Stone type: sandstone

Place of discovery: NO c363 098

Present location: uncertain, Crawford Priory now ruinous. Plaster cast of stone in National Museums Scotland (X.IB 175).

Evidence for discovery: found on Walton Farm in the nineteenth century and taken to Crawford Priory. John Abercromby presented the cast to NMAS in April 1894.

Present condition:

Description

This fragment appears to have been trimmed for re-use. It is carved in both incision and relief but the designs are incomplete. Incised is the head of an eagle with typically hooked beak, facing right. Below its beak is a design carved in relief: circular with an inner decorated ring, the outer band is in relief. Thomas likened it to a Donside terret, and Fraser to the head of a tuning fork symbol. The Ordnance Survey recorded that, when the cast of the stone was examined in NMAS in 1971, R B K Stevenson expressed doubts about the authenticity of the original.

Date: seventh century?

References: ECMS pt 3, 344; Thomas 1963, 46, pl 2; Fraser 2008, no 86.

Desk-based information compiled by A Ritchie 2016.

Activities

Reference (1903)

Walton farm-house is situated on the west slope of Walton Hill, 200 feet above sea-level, a mile and a half S.E. of Springfield railway station, and 3 1/2 miles S.W. of Cupar-Fife.

The symbol stone was found on Walton farm, and is now in the possession of Lady Gertrude Cochrane at Crawford Priory, 1/2 a mile S.E. of Springfield railway station. There is an ancient fort close to Walton farm-house, on the N side of it.

The monument is a fragment of a slab of Old Red Sandstone, nearly square in shape (but fragmented along all the edges), 1 foot long by 1 foot wide by from 4 to 5 inches thick, sculptured with incised symbols on one face thus-

Front.- At the top on the left, the head of the eagle symbol; and below in the middle, a circular disc with a somewhat heart-shaped figure on it.

J R Allen and J Anderson 1903

Desk Based Assessment

NO30NE 1 c. 363 096

Class I symbol stone.

(Undated) information in NMRS.

Found on Walton Farm and formerly preserved in Crawford Priory; a cast of the slab was presented to National Museum of Antiquities of Scotland (NMAS) in 1894 (IB 175). A partly dressed sandstone slab (0.3m by 0.3m and 0.13m thick), it bears the head of an eagle and a curved shape sometimes interpreted as an terret. When the stone was examined in NMAS in 1971 doubts were expressed about its authenticity.

Information from OS.

J R Allen and J Anderson 1903; A C Thomas 1961; A C Thomas 1963; RCAHMS 1985.

References

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