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Glencarse

Souterrain (Prehistoric), Unenclosed Settlement (Period Unassigned)

Site Name Glencarse

Classification Souterrain (Prehistoric), Unenclosed Settlement (Period Unassigned)

Alternative Name(s) Glendoick

Canmore ID 30488

Site Number NO22SW 12

NGR NO 2026 2243

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/30488

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
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Administrative Areas

  • Council Perth And Kinross
  • Parish Kinfauns
  • Former Region Tayside
  • Former District Perth And Kinross
  • Former County Perthshire

Archaeology Notes

NO22SW 12 2026 2243.

On a sandy plateau 1km NNE of Glencarse village exceptionally clear cropmark indications of what appeared to be a souterrain were recorded from the air. Roughly C-shaped on plan and measuring c.22m across the horns the structure was first located by probing and then uncovered in a trial trench which confirmed that it was indeed a souterrain; doubtless originally wooden-roofed, it measured 2.25m in width internally and had been built in a trench, c5.3m wide, excavated at least 2.1m into the sand subsoil. The site is in an excellent state of preservation, possibly because of the generous depth of overlying modern topsoil. Cropmarks 50m NE of souterrain.

G S Maxwell 1982

A dark mark at the northern end of this souterrain suggests the presence of a round-house.

Information from RCAHMS (JRS) 10 December 1992.

(Name cited as Glendoick). Scheduled with NO22SW 56.

Information from Historic Scotland, scheduling document dated 15 November 1999.

Recent aerial photography (RCAHMSAP 1995) has revealed the cropmarks of a further two souterrains in the immediate area (NO22SW 79 and NO22SW 80 ). It is probable that these sites as well as previously recorded souterrains, cropmarks and pits (NO22SW 39, NO22SW 56, NO22SW 58 ) are part of the same open settlement.

Information from RCAHMS (KB, GSM) 31 August 1999

Activities

Aerial Photographic Transcription (19 July 1988)

An aerial transcription was produced from oblique aerial photographs. Information from Historic Environment Scotland (BM) 31 March 2017.

Archaeological Evaluation (November 2007 - March 2008)

NO 2026 2243 An investigation into the impact of polytunnels on cropmark monuments was carried out in a polytunnel covered field in November 2007 and March 2008. The area contains a souterrain (NO22SW 12) known from cropmark evidence. It is one element of what is probably a larger open settlement with other souterrains and structures, which are collectively protected as a scheduled ancient monument (SAM 7222). The souterrain was investigated by GS Maxwell in 1982.

The project aimed to establish the present position of all ground-breaking elements of the polytunnel prior to its

demolition and removal, to recover evidence for the nature and extent of any changes to the condition of the site and to investigate the present condition of the souterrain. The project was therefore undertaken in two phases.

Aerial photo rectification, survey and test pitting prior to dismantling.

Evaluation trenching following removal of the polytunnels.

Survey established the positions of the ground-breaking elements of the polytunnels prior to their removal. Two main elements were recorded, the support posts and the irrigation pipes. Test-pitting while the superstructure was in place established the depth of excavations associated with the polytunnel construction.

Test-pits were hand-excavated and revealed that the support posts had penetrated the subsoil to varying depths of up to 0.35m and were spaced at intervals of 2.2m along the wall lines of the polytunnels. The irrigation pipes were buried in a machine-dug trench at a depth of 0.35m below the surface.

Two trial trenches, totalling 54m2, were excavated by machine across the known location of the souterrain and

were positioned to intersect with the former location of ground-breaking elements of the polytunnel structures. The souterrain was lined with stone and measured 1.2m–2.6m wide by up to 1.7m deep; a stone paved floor was recorded in only one sondage. A buried soil and an associated cut feature appeared to lie over the souterrain. This latter feature measured at least 7.9m across by 0.6m deep but its extent and purpose were not established.

Polytunnel support posts were found to have impacted upon the souterrain to a depth of between 0.2m–0.3m. One of them cut through the upper part of the souterrain wall. An irrigation pipe trench was also found to have cut across the upper fill and wall of the souterrain and across the associated feature.

Archive: RCAHMS (intended).

Report: Historic Scotland, Perth and Kinross SMR and RCAHMS

Funder: Historic Scotland

Ian Suddaby (CFA Archaeology Ltd), 2008

Watching Brief (1 November 2007 - 5 March 2008)

An investigation into the impact of polytunnels on cropmark monuments. The study area contained a souterrain (NO22SW 12). Aims- to establish present position of all ground-breaking elements of the polytunnel prior to demolition and removal from the site of the souterrain; to recover evidence for the nature and extent of changes to the condition of the site caused by the imposition and removal of the polytunnel; and to investigate the present condition of the souterrain. Aerial photo rectification, survey and test-pitting prior to dismantling; Evaluation trenching following removal of the polytunnels Survey established the positions of groundbreaking elements of the polytunnels prior to removal: the support posts and the irrigation pipes were recorded. Test-piting while the superstructure was still in place established the depths of excavation for the various elements associated with polytunnel construction and the methods by which they had been fixed in the ground. Two trial trenches totalling 54m2 were excavated by machine across the known location of the souterrain and were designed to intersect with the former location of ground breaking elements of the polytunnel structures. The souterrain was lined with stone and measured 1.2m-2.6m wide by up to 1.7m deep. Polytunnel support posts were found to have impacted upon the souterrain to a depth of between 0.2m-0.3m, one of which cut through the upper part of the souterrain wall. An irrigation pipe trench was also found to have cut across the upper fill and wall of the souterrain and across the associated feature.

CFA rchaeology (I. Suddaby and P. Richardson) OASIS ID: cfaarcha1-43752

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