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Edinburgh, South Queensferry, Echline Avenue

Pit(S) (Period Unassigned), Pottery Scatter(S) (Neolithic), Hammer (Possible), Worked Object(S) (Quartz)(Neolithic), Worked Object(S) (Chert)(Neolithic)

Site Name Edinburgh, South Queensferry, Echline Avenue

Classification Pit(S) (Period Unassigned), Pottery Scatter(S) (Neolithic), Hammer (Possible), Worked Object(S) (Quartz)(Neolithic), Worked Object(S) (Chert)(Neolithic)

Canmore ID 283650

Site Number NT17NW 290

NGR NT 12175 78184

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/283650

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
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Administrative Areas

  • Council Edinburgh, City Of
  • Parish Dalmeny
  • Former Region Lothian
  • Former District City Of Edinburgh
  • Former County West Lothian

Archaeology Notes

NT17NW 290 12175 78184

NT 12175 78184 An evaluation was carried out in February 2005 in parkland bordering Echline Avenue. Thirteen trenches

covering an area of 614m2 were excavated. A single pit containing three sherds of prehistoric pottery and an area of rig and furrow were discovered. The pit was circular with a diameter of 0.55m and a depth of 0.12m.

Archive to be deposited in NMRS.

Sponsor: Places for People Group Ltd.

M Kirby 2005

Activities

Archaeological Evaluation (February 2005)

NT 12175 78184 An evaluation was carried out in February 2005 in parkland bordering Echline Avenue. Thirteen trenches covering an area of 614m2 were excavated. A single pit containing three sherds of prehistoric pottery and an area of rig and furrow were discovered. The pit was circular with a diameter of 0.55m and a depth of 0.12m.

Archive to be deposited in NMRS.

Sponsor: Places for People Group Ltd.

M Kirby 2005

Watching Brief (September 2007 - October 2007)

NT 12175 78184 A monitored topsoil strip and watching brief were carried out during September and October 2007 during groundworks for a development. A pit containing prehistoric pottery was previously identified during an archaeological evaluation carried out by CFA in February 2005 (DES 2005, 69). The current fieldwork led to the identification of 19 additional pits. Three contained prehistoric artefacts, comprising pottery of

probable Late Neolithic/Early Bronze Age date, a crude hammer or grinding stone and pieces of worked quartz and chert. Soil samples from the pits containing prehistoric material were retained for analysis.

Archive deposited with RCAHMS, City of Edinburgh Council SMR.

Funder: Places for People Group Ltd.

Reference

NT 12175 78184 An evaluation and subsequent fieldwork carried out revealed several scattered pits (DES 2005 and 2007). The artefacts recovered during the excavation of the pits consisted of 39 sherds of prehistoric pottery, four lithics and a coarse stone tool.

The pottery assemblage was studied by Melanie Johnson and has been identified as mid to late Neolithic Impressed Ware. The presence of impressed and incised decoration, including twisted cord, stabs, fingernail and lattices, is characteristic of this period. The rim forms and vessel shapes where discernible include heavy jars typical of the Late Neolithic.

The form and decoration of the vessels have many similarities with other assemblages from the E of Scotland,

including Balfarg and Grandtully in Perthshire and Dubton in Brechin. This type of ware is now thought to date to the second half of the 4th and the first half of the 3rd millennium BC. There appear to be some differences between excavated assemblages, both in terms of dominant vessel forms and decorative techniques. The style is varied and regional groupings are not readily apparent. More synthetic work is needed to establish whether such groupings exist.

Four lithics were recovered and studied by Torben Ballin. Two artefacts (one chert, one quartz) were based on blade blanks (macroblades). The small group has been tentatively dated to the Middle Neolithic, or the earlier part of the Late Neolithic period. Unfortunately, no prehistoric pottery was recovered from the pit in which the two blades were found, but the other two finds, both quartz flakes, were associated with Late Neolithic pottery.

A single cobble tool was collected from a pit fill, in association with Late Neolithic pottery and a quartz flake. The angular edge shows signs of pecking and the cobble is likely to have been used as an expedient tool, presumably a hammerstone.

Small fragments of wood charcoal were recovered from one sample flot, but unfortunately they were not suitable for AMS dating.

Report: CECAS and RCAHMS

Funder: Places for People Group Ltd

Magnus Kirby and Sue Anderson (CFA Archaeology Ltd), 2008

References

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