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Mid Torrie, 'the Auld Knowe'

Dun (Iron Age), Fort (Prehistoric)

Site Name Mid Torrie, 'the Auld Knowe'

Classification Dun (Iron Age), Fort (Prehistoric)

Alternative Name(s) Wester Torrie; Callander

Canmore ID 24378

Site Number NN60SE 1

NGR NN 65276 04804

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/24378

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
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Administrative Areas

  • Council Stirling
  • Parish Kilmadock
  • Former Region Central
  • Former District Stirling
  • Former County Perthshire

Archaeology Notes

NN60SE 1 6526 0480.

NN 6526 0480 Roman Camp (NR) (Site of)

OS 6" map, Perthshire, 2nd ed., (1901)

Fort, Callander. Although it is marked as 'Roman Camp, Site' on the OS 6" map, the structure is a native fort measuring some 500' in length from WNW to ESE by c. 200' in maximum width. It occupies a ridge which presents a steep slope about 60' in height to the River Teith on the N, but which is easily accessible from the other directions.

On the highest point of the ridge there has been a roughly circular enclosure (A) measuring 40' to 50' in diameter. It was probably surrounded by a stone wall, but is in such a wrecked condition that apart from the internal dimensions already given nothing can usefully be said about it in default of excavation. Only a single stone is visible which might be in place in the supposed wall, and the interior of the site is choked with nettles.

It seems possible that the enclosure described above is a dun which has been inserted into an Early Iron Age fort. The latter is represented by the rampart or wall marked 'B' on the accompanying sketch, which, at the present time, is merely a low, turf-covered mound. At either end there are loop walls or ramparts (C and D), while a further, outermost defence on the W is provided by a rock-cut ditch drawn across the narrow neck of the ridge. A gap in B at the point marked X on the sketch may represent an original entrance, but there is no sign of internal buildings. Information from RCAHMS TS, visited 10 June 1957.

A fort, locally known as 'The Auld Knowe'.

D Christison 1902.

A fort and dun as described by RCAHMS.

Visited by OS (E G C) 29 October 1968.

Visible on vertical air photograph (OS 66/97/109, flown 1966).

Information from RCAHMS (RJM/DE) July 1996

Activities

Field Visit (10 June 1957)

Fort, Callander.

Although it is marked as 'Roman Camp, Site' on the OS 6" map, the structure is a native fort measuring some 500' in length from WNW to ESE by c. 200' in maximum width. It occupies a ridge which presents a steep slope about 60' in height to the River Teith on the N, but which is easily accessible from the other directions.

On the highest point of the ridge there has been a roughly circular enclosure (A) measuring 40' to 50' in diameter. It was probably surrounded by a stone wall, but is in such a wrecked condition that apart from the internal dimensions already given nothing can usefully be said about it in default of excavation. Only a single stone is visible which might be in place in the supposed wall, and the interior of the site is choked with nettles.

It seems possible that the enclosure described above is a dun which has been inserted into an Early Iron Age fort. The latter is represented by the rampart or wall marked 'B' on the accompanying sketch, which, at the present time, is merely a low, turf-covered mound. At either end there are loop walls or ramparts (C and D), while a further, outermost defence on the W is provided by a rock-cut ditch drawn across the narrow neck of the ridge. A gap in B at the point marked X on the sketch may represent an original entrance, but there is no sign of internal buildings. Information from RCAHMS TS, visited 10 June 1957.

Measured Survey (7 April 1960)

Field Visit (September 1978)

Auld Knowe, Wester Torrie * NN 652 048 NN60SE 1

This dun and its outworks occupy a prominent knoll on the S side of the river Teith.

RCAHMS 1979, visited September 1978

Christison 1902, 614-18

Note (5 December 2014 - 18 May 2016)

What may be the remains of a fort enclose an elongated ridge that rises above the river terrace on the S bank of the River Teith. The rampart, which is largely reduced to a scarp but is accompanied by an external ditch cut through the rock on the spine of the ridge on the NW, can be traced on an irregular course around the gentler flanks on the SE, SW and NW to enclose an area measuring a maximum of 70m from NW to SE by 38m transversely (0.19ha). At the SE end an outer rampart encloses a further area of about 0.08ha on a lower terrace. The ramparts have been severely mutilated and several tracks cut through them on the SE, the SSW and the W. That on the SSW is evidently later, and while the gap on the W is set in a shallow re-entrant, the one running up the spine of the ridge through gaps in both ramparts on the ESE is quite likely to mark the position of the original entrance. Within the interior, on the very summit of the ridge, there is a probable dun or broch, though its wall is now reduced to a grass-grown mound enclosing an area about 15m in maximum diameter. The interior of the fort is otherwise featureless.

Information from An Atlas of Hillforts of Great Britain and Ireland – 18 May 2016. Atlas of Hillforts SC2614

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