Accessibility

Font Size

100% 150% 200%

Background Colour

Default Contrast
Close Reset

Midhouse Of Corrigall

Farmhouse (18th Century), Farmstead (18th Century), Kiln Barn (18th Century), Museum (19-20th Century), Threshing Mill (19th Century)

Site Name Midhouse Of Corrigall

Classification Farmhouse (18th Century), Farmstead (18th Century), Kiln Barn (18th Century), Museum (19-20th Century), Threshing Mill (19th Century)

Alternative Name(s) Mid-house Of Corrigall, Threshing Mill

Canmore ID 2052

Site Number HY31NW 58

NGR HY 32446 19333

NGR Description Centred on HY 32446 19333

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/2052

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
Canmore Disclaimer. © Copyright and database right 2019.

Toggle Aerial | View on large map

Digital Images

Administrative Areas

  • Council Orkney Islands
  • Parish Birsay And Harray
  • Former Region Orkney Islands Area
  • Former District Orkney
  • Former County Orkney

Archaeology Notes

HY31NW 58.00 32446 19333

HY31NW 58.01 HY 3248 1938 Aqueduct

(Location cited as HY 340 182). Threshing mill, Mid-house of Corrigal. A single-storey drystone rubble building, with the axle and ring only of a six-spoke, start and awe single-ring wheel. The machinery has been removed.

J R Hume 1977.

Activities

Publication Account (1977)

(Location cited as HY 340 182). Threshing mill, Mid-house of Corrigal. A single-storey drystone rubble building, with the axle and ring only of a six-spoke, start and awe single-ring wheel. The machinery has been removed.

J R Hume 1977.

Orkney Smr Note (September 1987)

Erected about 1730-40. Similar in design to Kirbuster, Birsay, except that there is no neuk bed and the outer door opens directly into the firehouse.The extra room is styled the 'lower room'. The date of erection can be deduced from the fact that, about 1730-40 the owner, James Corrigall, redeemed the property and came to live there. Prior to this the family had lived in Firth and the place was let. The firehouse is 21ft long and the seller 19ft long. The 'W end' is 31ft long and divided by a wooden partition. [R1] This house is known as CORRIGALL FARM MUSEUM.

Information from Orkney SMR (RB) Sept 1987.

Publication Account (1996)

The range of buildings belonging to this steading date from the mid 18th century, and they have been beautifully restored to evoke a strong sense of farming life in the mid 19th century (the farm was inhabited until the mid 20th century, when its potential for the creation of a rural museum was recognised, and it was bought by Orkney County Council). Not only has the fabric of the buildings been restored, but they have also been furnished with contemporary fittings and equipment typical of 19th-century life - you are likely to find a resident hen, to see Orkney cheeses maturing and fish drying, and to smell the peat burning on the hearth. In 1981, the museum won the Award of the Association for the Preservation of Rural Scotland 'as a particularly fine example of restoration work in a rural setting'.

The three major buildings form a close-knit group running parallel to each other, with paving between them: the dwelling range, a barn and stable range and a separate byre. It is likely that the west end of the dwelling was originally a byre, but, by the mid 19th century, it had become a parlour with adjacent kitchen, living room and bedroom. The byre is furnished with stone partition-slabs, forming stalls, and a central drain, accommodating the cattle over the winter. The original stable for the native small horses is attached to the south side of the barn, with a manger built into the wall at either end, but the adoption of larger work horses in the 19th century led to the provision of a larger stable at the east end of the barn, which has timber-built stalls. The barn itself was primarily concerned with the preparation of grain for grinding into flour: a clay floor where the grain was threshed, opposing doorways to create the through-draught for winnowing, and a circular kiln for drying the grain. All the roofs consist of flagstones on a timber frame, covered with an insulating layer of turf.

The steading is well placed, with the Burn of Corrigall nearby to provide a source of water not only for domestic use but also, by the later 19th centuty, for a separate threshing mill powered by a water-wheel, the water for which was carried in an unusual aqueduct over the burn.

Information from ‘Exploring Scotland’s Heritage: Orkney’, (1996).

References

MyCanmore Image Contributions


Contribute an Image

MyCanmore Text Contributions