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Loch Doon Dam

Dam (20th Century), Dam (First World War)

Site Name Loch Doon Dam

Classification Dam (20th Century), Dam (First World War)

Alternative Name(s) Loch Doon Storage Works; Loch Doon, North Dam; River Doon; Galloway Hydroelectric Scheme

Canmore ID 194898

Site Number NS40SE 34

NGR NS 47723 01434

NGR Description NX 47721 01398 to NX 47757 01533

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/194898

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
Canmore Disclaimer. © Copyright and database right 2020.

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Digital Images

Administrative Areas

  • Council East Ayrshire
  • Parish Dalmellington
  • Former Region Strathclyde
  • Former District Cumnock And Doon Valley
  • Former County Ayrshire

World War One Audit of Surviving Remains (12 June 2013)

The most major change brought about by the construction of the Loch Doon Gunnery School in 1916 was the raising of the level of the loch by 6 feet (1.8m) by the construction of a hydro-electric dam at its northern outlet at Bridge of Ness, intended to provide power to the school. The loch was already dammed and controlled (by sluices shown on the 1909 1:2500 OS 2nd edition map). This dam was replaced by a far higher dam in 1936.

Information from HS/RCAHMS World War One Audit Project (GJB) 12 June 2013.

Archaeology Notes

NS40SE 34.00 47721 01398 to 47757 01533

Loch Doon Dam [NAT]

OS 1:10,000 map, 1978.

NS40SE 34.06 NS 47736 01431 Valve tower

For Loch Doon, Reservoir (centred NX 49 97) and associated structures, see NX49NE 20.

For other parts of the Gunnery School see NS40NE 78.00, NX49NE 17.00 and NX49SE 36.

Not to be confused with Muck Burn Dam (NX 50905 99160 to NX 50975 99219), for which see NX59NW 43.

Location formerly entered as NS 4773 0143.

Loch Doon dam

Purpose: seasonal storage

Type: gravity

Maximum height of footway above river-bed: 43ft (13.1m)

Total length along crest: 980ft (298.7m)

Spillway level: 705ft (22.9m) OD

Normal maximum depth over crest: 3ft (0.9m)

Overfall spillway length: 110ft (33.5m)

Syphons (3): 5ft 6ins (1.7m) outlet diameter

Normal maximum spillway capacity: 4675 cusecs

Anon. 1938 ['Galloway Hydro-Electric Development'].

Loch Doon dam was intially built to create a head of water for the hydro-electric power station required to power the target system and other elements of the Loch Doon Gunnery School. Designed to raise the water level of the Loch by 6 feet, the level was increased to 30 feet during 1936. This latter action drowned the elements of the gunnery school which were located close to the waters edge.

(Undated) information from Kirkdale Archaeology, Report for Loch Doon Action Group.

The pre-existing Loch Doon was dammed and the water level raised to form a major element of stage II of the Galloway Hydro-electric Scheme. It supplied water to the Water of Deugh, and hence to power stations at Kendoon, Carsfad (NX68NW 26), Earlstoun (NX68SW 147) and Tongland (NX65SE 86.00).

This dam was apparently intended solely to control the level of the loch, and so has neither integral nor directly associated generating capacity.

Information from RCAHMS (RJCM), 21 October 2005.

Gibb and Partners et al. 1937.

Activities

Publication Account (1938)

Loch Doon dam

Purpose: seasonal storage

Type: gravity

Maximum height of footway above river-bed: 43ft (13.1m)

Total length along crest: 980ft (298.7m)

Spillway level: 705ft (22.9m) OD

Normal maximum depth over crest: 3ft (0.9m)

Overfall spillway length: 110ft (33.5m)

Syphons (3): 5ft 6ins (1.7m) outlet diameter

Normal maximum spillway capacity: 4675 cusecs

Anon. 1938 ['Galloway Hydro-Electric Development'].

Note (21 October 2005)

The pre-existing Loch Doon was dammed and the water level raised to form a major element of stage II of the Galloway Hydro-electric Scheme. It supplied water to the Water of Deugh, and hence to power stations at Kendoon, Carsfad (NX68NW 26), Earlstoun (NX68SW 147) and Tongland (NX65SE 86.00).

This dam was apparently intended solely to control the level of the loch, and so has neither integral nor directly associated generating capacity.

Information from RCAHMS (RJCM), 21 October 2005.

Gibb and Partners et al. 1937.

Aerial Photography (1 May 2007)

Project (2007)

This project was undertaken to input site information listed in 'Civil engineering heritage: Scotland - Lowlands and Borders' by R Paxton and J Shipway, 2007.

Publication Account (2007)

Loch Doon Dam provides the main seasonal storage for the upper three power stations on the Dee. Its original level was raised 27 ft by the construction of the dam across its natural outlet at the northern end.

The total length of the dam is 980 ft, the main central portion consisting of a mass concrete structure of the

gravity type, slightly curved in plan. There is a 16 ft wide roadway along the crest. Flood water is dealt with by the 110 ft wide spillway assisted by a group of three siphons on the north flank. An interesting feature of the dam is the fish pass, which rises spirally inside a circular concrete tower within the reservoir.

This dam was also completed in 1937. The consulting engineer was Sir Alexander Gibb & Partners and the

main contractor, Sir Robert McAlpine & Sons Ltd.

R Paxton and J Shipway 2007

Reproduced from 'Civil Engineering heritage: Scotland - Lowlands and Borders' with kind permission from Thomas Telford Publishers.

Field Visit (2010)

This dam controls the outflow from Loch Doon allowing storage capacity to be developed in the loch. Water is fed out at the S end of the loch into the River Deuch which conveys it down towards Kendoon. The dam is at the N end of the loch and regulates the flow across the watershed of the River Doon. The dam has a highly unusual octagonal section spiral fish ladder integrated into the upstream wall. This dam is of combined arch and gravity type and has an integrated spillway. The arcaded parapeted walkway to the top accommodates the public road. The design contains a highly unusual fish ladder which consists of an octagonal drum with an ascending spiral of linked water filled chambers. The dam is a significant landscape feature in an area of low moorland terrain. P L Payne, 1988, 24; E Wood, 2002, 50; G Hill, 1984.

Project (March 2013 - September 2013)

A project to characterise the quantity and quality of the Scottish resource of known surviving remains of the First World War. Carried out in partnership between Historic Scotland and RCAHMS.

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