Accessibility

Font Size

100% 150% 200%

Background Colour

Default Contrast
Close Reset

Our online mapping services, aerial photography and satellite imaging layers are undergoing scheduled maintenance on Sundays in June. Service might be intermittent or unavailable on 6, 20 and 27 June. Thank you for your patience.

 

Inaltry

Castle (Medieval)

Site Name Inaltry

Classification Castle (Medieval)

Alternative Name(s) 'The Auld Castle At Inaltrie'; Auld Castle Of Inalterie; Burn Of Deskford

Canmore ID 17980

Site Number NJ56SW 12

NGR NJ 5177 6305

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/17980

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
Canmore Disclaimer. © Copyright and database right 2021.

Toggle Aerial | View on large map

Administrative Areas

  • Council Moray
  • Parish Deskford
  • Former Region Grampian
  • Former District Moray
  • Former County Banffshire

Archaeology Notes

NJ56SW 12 5177 6305.

(NJ 5177 6305) Supposed Remains of Castle (NR)

or Ecclesiastical Edifice (NR)

OS 6" map, Banffshire, 2nd ed., (1905)

On the farm of Inalterie there are the remains of a very strong building about which nothing is known. In one part of this building there is a deep circular hole, about the diameter of an ordinary draw-well, enclosed by a stone wall rising to a considerable height in the building. This hole is now filled up with rubbish. Close to it there is a vault on the top of which the tenant now has his kailyard. Some years ago a stair was found leading down to it.

New Statistical Account (NSA) 1845.

It is sometimes referred to in the neighbourhood as 'The Auld Castle at Inaltrie'.

Name Book 1866.

Only one wall remains of this building. It is of rubble masonry and measures 17.3m long by 2.4m thick and is 3.0m high. In the north side of the wall are the remains of two small niches. The remains of the circular hole mentioned by NSA (1845) can be seen on the south face of the wall at its west end. No trace of the vault mentioned can now be seen. The nature of the building cannot be ascertained from what now remains.

Visited by OS (WDJ) 14 September 1961.

As previously described. Dr Simpson, who has not visited the site, suggests that it is probably of 13th century date judging by the size of the wall and the type of bonding visible on the photograph.

Visited by OS (NKB) 19 July 1967; Information from Dr W D Simpson, University of Aberdeen.

Scheduled as 'Inaltry... the remains of a masonry castle situated on land rising to the E of the Burn of Deskford'.

Information from Historic Scotland, scheduling document dated 25 October 2005.

Between 28 February and 20 July 2001, a watching brief was maintained at certain points along the route of the installation of a water pipeline, between Burnend and Crannoch, Moray.

Only one wall remains of this 13th century castle, thought to be a property of the Lawties of Inaltrie or Inaltry. The pipeline approached the castle site going up a steep incline from N to S and passed within 20m of the W corner of the only surviving wall. The pipe trench was excavated through a varied strata of very loose unstable gravel and slightly clayey gravel. Great care had to be taken in the observation here, due to the danger of collapsing sections.

No structural or other features associated with the castle were evident, nor was there any indication of associated material such as medieval pottery.

J C Murray 2001

Activities

Reference (1845)

On the farm of Inalterie there are the remains of a very strong building about which nothing is known. In one part of this building there is a deep circular hole, about the diameter of an ordinary draw-well, enclosed by a stone wall rising to a considerable height in the building. This hole is now filled up with rubbish. Close to it there is a vault on the top of which the tenant now has his kailyard. Some years ago a stair was found leading down to it.

New Statistical Account (NSA) 1845.

Field Visit (1866)

It is sometimes referred to in the neighbourhood as 'The Auld Castle at Inaltrie'.

Name Book 1866.

Field Visit (14 September 1961)

Only one wall remains of this building. It is of rubble masonry and measures 17.3m long by 2.4m thick and is 3.0m high. In the north side of the wall are the remains of two small niches. The remains of the circular hole mentioned by NSA (1845) can be seen on the south face of the wall at its west end. No trace of the vault mentioned can now be seen. The nature of the building cannot be ascertained from what now remains.

Visited by OS (WDJ) 14 September 1961.

Field Visit (19 July 1967)

As previously described. Dr Simpson, who has not visited the site, suggests that it is probably of 13th century date judging by the size of the wall and the type of bonding visible on the photograph.

Visited by OS (NKB) 19 July 1967; Information from Dr W D Simpson, University of Aberdeen.

Watching Brief (28 February 2001 - 29 July 2001)

Between 28 February and 20 July 2001, a watching brief was maintained at certain points along the route of the installation of a water pipeline, between Burnend and Crannoch, Moray.

Only one wall remains of this 13th century castle, thought to be a property of the Lawties of Inaltrie or Inaltry. The pipeline approached the castle site going up a steep incline from N to S and passed within 20m of the W corner of the only surviving wall. The pipe trench was excavated through a varied strata of very loose unstable gravel and slightly clayey gravel. Great care had to be taken in the observation here, due to the danger of collapsing sections.

No structural or other features associated with the castle were evident, nor was there any indication of associated material such as medieval pottery.

J C Murray 2001

References

MyCanmore Image Contributions


Contribute an Image

MyCanmore Text Contributions