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Skye, Rubh' An Dunain, 'viking Canal'

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Oblique aerial view centred on Loch na h-Airde, the 'Viking Canal’ and Rubh' an Dunain, taken from the SW.
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Oblique aerial view centred on Loch na h-Airde, the 'Viking Canal’ and Rubh' an Dunain, taken from the SE.
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Oblique aerial view centred on Loch na h-Airde, the 'Viking Canal’ and Rubh' an Dunain, taken from the ENE.
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Oblique aerial view centred on Loch na h-Airde, the 'Viking Canal’ and Rubh' an Dunain, taken from the NE.
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General shot from dun.
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View of wall
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View of building footings.
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Loch na h-Airde from the settlement above Rubh’ an Dùnain, looking SW. The so-called ‘Tacksman’s House’ is in the foreground. (Colin Martin)
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Headland fort (skylined, on left), the two nausts below it, and the canal leading into Loch na h-Airde. The islet of Sgeir Mhòr and the sheltered anchorage lie beyond. Rum is on the horizon, and the headland on the far left is Dùnan Thalasgair on Eigg, which according to tradition was a watch-post and signal-stance linked to Rubh’ an Dùnain. (Colin Martin)
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Roger Miket plots measurements as Peter Martin calls them out.
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The site was potentially dangerous, and risk assessments were rigorous. Project Director Dr Colin Martin is more secure than he looks as he records details of the headland fort. (Paula Martin)
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Edward Martin, filmed by a BBC crew, steadies his aerial drone by the mouth of the canal prior to a photographic sortie. (Colin Martin)
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Trials have been made using sector scanning to search the loch bed for archaeological features. Here the equipment has been positioned near the canal mouth. Results so far have been encouraging, but a more sustained programme is required. (Colin Martin)
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Oblique aerial view centred on Loch na h-Airde, the 'Viking Canal’ and the remains of the dun at Rubh' an Dunain, taken from the SW.
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Oblique aerial view centred on Loch na h-Airde, the 'Viking Canal’ and Rubh' an Dunain, taken from the WSW.
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Oblique aerial view centred on Loch na h-Airde, the 'Viking Canal’ and Rubh' an Dunain, taken from the WSW.
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General oblique aerial view of the remains of the harbour at Rubh' an Dunain, looking towards the Cuillins, Isle of Skye, taken from the W.
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General shot (panorama)
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General shot (panorama)
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Aerial photograph of Loch na h-Airde from the NE, showing the canal, headland fort (extreme centre left) and the sheltered anchorage afforded by Sgeir Mhòr (top left). (Colin Martin)
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The Slochd Dubh – Black Dyke – a stone wall running from one side of the Rubh’ an Dùnain peninsula to the other, evidently defining a territorial boundary. Though the present wall is relatively modern its line shows modifications and traces of earlier structures, and the line may be of some antiquity. (Colin Martin)
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Headland fort from the W. Note the likelihood that much of its seaward interior has been lost to rock fall. (Colin Martin)
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Headland fort from the W. Note the likelihood that much of its seaward interior has been lost to rock fall. (Colin Martin)
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Headland fort, N face of wall, looking S towards Rum. (Colin Martin)
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