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Skye, Rubh' An Dunain, 'viking Canal'

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General oblique aerial view centred on Loch na h-Airde, the 'Viking Canal’ and Rubh' an Dunain with the Cuillin Hills in the background, taken from the WSW.
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Dr Colin Martin (left), the Project Director, confers on site with Dr David Macfadyen (right), who found the 12th century boat timber in 2000.With them is Gavin Parsons of Sabhal Mor Ostaig, the Gaelic College on Skye, who is advising on place-name studies and other local cultural issues. (Edward Martin)
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Attempts have been made to search the shallow loch bed, since it is likely that further early boat components will be found there. The simplest method has been to use a small inflatable raft pulled along rope lanes stretched across the loch by a snorkeller. (Colin Martin)
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Edward Martin composing the picture and adjusting the camera on the elevated pole-mounted camera system from his computer on the ground. (Colin Martin)
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The edge of the quay on the E side of the canal entrance into Loch na h-Airde. (Colin Martin)
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Rectified vertical mosaic taken by aerial drone of the stone-built quay features on either side of the canal entrance into Loch na h-Airde. (Edward Martin)
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The upper canal leading into Loch na h-Airde, with the blockage part-way along it. The left-hand revetment is relatively intact, but that on the right appears to have been dismantled to its foundations and the stones thrown onto the bank. Tradition asserts that this was done to bring larger vessels into the loch. Scale 2 metres. (Colin Martin)
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Detail of the change in the stonework between the lower and upper sectors of the canal. Scale 2 metres. (Colin Martin)
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Rectified vertical photomosaic of the canal, quay, and nausts taken by aerial drone. (Edward Martin)
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Vertical aerial photograph from drone of the headland fort at Rubh’ an Dùnain. (Edward Martin)
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Aerial photograph of the canal and headland fort from the SW. The cleared channel towards the mouth of the canal is evident. (Colin Martin)
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Aerial photograph of the canal and headland fort from the NW. The cleared channel towards the mouth of the canal is evident. (Colin Martin)
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General shot of building
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General oblique aerial view of the remains of the harbour at Rubh' an Dunain, looking towards the Cuillins, Isle of Skye, taken from the WSW.
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General oblique aerial view centred on the harbour at Loch na h-Airde, the 'Viking Canal’ and Rubh' an Dunain, looking WSW.
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General oblique aerial view centred on Loch na h-Airde, the 'Viking Canal’ and the remains of the dun at Rubh' an Dunain, taken from the WNW.
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Dr Colin Martin (left), the Project Director, confers on site with Dr David Macfadyen (right), who found the 12th century boat timber in 2000.With them is Gavin Parsons of Sabhal Mor Ostaig, the Gaelic College on Skye, who is advising on place-name studies and other local cultural issues. (Edward Martin)
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Trials have been made using sector scanning to search the loch bed for archaeological features. The equipment is seen here being positioned. Results so far have been encouraging, but a more sustained programme is required. (Colin Martin)
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Trials have been made using sector scanning to search the loch bed for archaeological features. The equipment is seen here assembled and ready for launching. (Colin Martin)
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Attempts have been made to search the shallow loch bed, since it is likely that further early boat components will be found there. The simplest method has been to use a small inflatable raft pulled along rope lanes stretched across the loch by a snorkeller. (Colin Martin)
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Edward Martin prepares to take oblique photographs of the headland fort with the elevated pole-mounted camera system in 2009. (Colin Martin)
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Beginning a survey of the canal. From left, Roger Miket, who first recognised the site’s potential in the 1980s, Dr David Caldwell of the National Museums of Scotland, and Peter Martin (Colin Martin)
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Tumbled stonework from the quay on the E side of the canal entrance into Loch na h-Airde. (Colin Martin)
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The upper canal leading into Loch na h-Airde, with the blockage part-way along it. The left-hand revetment is relatively intact, but that on the right appears to have been dismantled to its foundations and the stones thrown onto the bank. Tradition asserts that this was done to bring larger vessels into the loch. (Colin Martin)
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