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North Uist, Tigharry, Sithean Eaval

Barrow (Prehistoric)(Possible), Natural Feature (Period Unknown)(Possible)

Site Name North Uist, Tigharry, Sithean Eaval

Classification Barrow (Prehistoric)(Possible), Natural Feature (Period Unknown)(Possible)

Alternative Name(s) Cnoc Eaval; Loch Eaval

Canmore ID 10105

Site Number NF77SW 14

NGR NF 72053 72189

NGR Description Centred NF 7204 7221

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/site/10105

Ordnance Survey licence number 100057073. All rights reserved.
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Digital Images

Administrative Areas

  • Council Western Isles
  • Parish North Uist
  • Former Region Western Isles Islands Area
  • Former District Western Isles
  • Former County Inverness-shire

Archaeology Notes

NF77SW 14 centred 7204 7221

(Name : NF 7204 7221) Sithean Eaval stands at the N end of Loch Eaval on a slight elevation called Cnoc Eaval. It is a small green mound bearing a strong resemblance to Sithean Altair (NF77NE 9) which contained LBA cist burials.

E Beveridge 1911.

Sithean Eaval is a small grass-covered earth-and-stone mound, 8.5m N-S by 6.5m E-W and 1.7m high, at the foot of the eastern slope of Knock Eaval.

It bears no evidence of antiquity.

Visited by OS (J T T), 16 June 1965.

Activities

Desk Based Assessment (28 January 1965)

(Name : NF 7204 7221) Sithean Eaval stands at the N end of Loch Eaval on a slight elevation called Cnoc Eaval. It is a small green mound bearing a strong resemblance to Sithean Altair (NF77NE 9) which contained LBA cist burials.

Information from OS (BRS) 28 January 1965

E Beveridge 1911.

Field Visit (16 June 1965)

Sithean Eaval is a small grass-covered earth-and-stone mound, 8.5m N-S by 6.5m E-W and 1.7m high, at the foot of the eastern slope of Knock Eaval.

It bears no evidence of antiquity.

Visited by OS (J T T), 16 June 1965.

Field Visit (31 May 2012)

Previously identified as a probably natural feature, this grass-grown mound seems to be out of place within the natural topography and it may, therefore, be a barrow. It measures 7.5m from N to S by 5m transversely and up to 1.3m in height, but its western side has clearly been truncated by ploughing.

Visited by RCAHMS (JRS, ATW), 31 May 2012.

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