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View of nos. 69 - 79 High Street from NE.
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View from south of 79 High Street, Coldstream
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View from south east of 79 High Street, Coldstream
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Lockerbie, general view, showing High Street and Holy Trinity Roman Catholic Church.  Oblique aerial photograph taken facing north.
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View from NE.
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View from South-West.
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Isometric sketch showing proposed alterations
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View from SE.
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View from S.
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General view (79b)
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General view from S.
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General view of rear from N.
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General view, view West along High Street, from Cross Wynd
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79,80and 81 High STreet.
View from South.
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Probable oar-port shutter from a 13th-century context. Such devices were intended to keep the oar-ports of clinker-built ships weather-proof when not in use. They were mounted on pivots inside the hull so they could be swung clear when the ports needed to be open, and were equipped with an arrangement whereby they could be secured in whichever position was required. The triangular appendage on this example presumably fulfilled this function and the two small notches near its point were no doubt intended for a fixing loop. The use of such a cover implies a vessel with greater freeboard than one whose oars were operated from tholes set atop the gunwale. This object is therefore a relic of what was probably a substantial sea-gong ship propelled primarily by sail. It may not have been dissimilar to the well-known sailing galley depicted on the tomb of Alexander MacLeod at Rodel in Harris. (Cat No 354/A6476)
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An oak claw thole from a clinker-built vessel, apparently re-used in a building in a context dating from the second half of the 12th century. These devices were mounted on top of the gunwale as fulcrums against which the oars were pivoted. The oars were restrained on the backstroke by a rope or leather thong grommet for which the upper holes	was provided. These items are a common feature of early Northern European boats and have survived in Scandinavia into modern times. One was recognised as a sand-impression on the 7th-century AD Sutton Hoo ship, while others have been identified on the 4th-century AD Nydam ship, and on the small faering found with the 9th-century AD Gokstadt ship. (Cat No 84/A6085)
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Upright thole from a clinker-built vessel, re-used in a 13th-century context. The wood is oak, from which a suitably-shaped branch-junction has been selected. On either side of the upright can be seen the stumps of two iron rods, on the centreline of the timber,. These are probably the 	remains of pins designed to retain the oar on the return stroke. That one is located on either side suggests that the vessel on which the thole was mounted was intended to be rowed in both directions. Upright tholes are much less common in the medieval period than claw tholes. This rarity suggests that this piece may have belonged to specialised vessel. A double-ended ferry seems a possibility. (Cat No 269/A05–0224)
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Clinker-type frame timber of oak. This is a "grown" timber; that is, it is fashioned from part of a tree where a natural junction provides the basis for the required shape. The bottom of the frame has been squared off to accommodate a keel approximately 90 mm wide. On one side of the keel (the right-hand in this photography) a 30-mm square cut has been made. This is to create a passage (limber-hole) to allow water to drain freely to a point where it can be pumped or baled. Above this, a series of stepped recesses on the outer edge of the frame indicates at least four runs of overlapping clinker planking. The first three strakes flare evenly upwards, while the fourth shows a distinct flattening out. This suggests a flared V-bottom such as might be expected towards one or other of the vessel's extremities. Scale 50 cm.
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An oak claw thole from a clinker-built vessel, apparently re-used in a building in a context dating from the second half of the 12th century. These devices were mounted on top of the gunwale as fulcrums against which the oars were pivoted. The oars were restrained on the backstroke by a rope or leather thong grommet for which the hole was provided. These items are a common feature of early Northern-European boats and have survived in Scandinavia into modern times. One was recognised as a sand-impression on the 7th-century AD Sutton Hoo ship, while others have been identified on the 4th-century AD Nydam ship, and on the small faering found with the 9th-century AD Gokstad ship. (Cat No 84/A6085)
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The reverse side of Perth05. Scale 25 cm. (Cat No 84/A6085)
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Clinker-type frame timber of oak. This is a "grown" timber; that is, it is fashioned from part of a tree where a natural junction provides the basis for the required shape. The bottom of the frame has been squared off to accommodate a keel approximately 90 mm wide. On one side of the keel (the right-hand in this photograph) a 30-mm square cut has been made. This is to create a passage (limber-hole) to allow water to drain freely to a well where it can be pumped or baled. Above this, a series of stepped recesses on the outer edge of the frame indicates at least four runs of overlapping clinker planking. The first three strakes flare evenly upwards, while the fourth shows a distinct flattening out. This suggests a flared V-bottom such as might be expected towards one or other of the vessel's extremities. Scale 50 cm. (Cat No 104/A12578)
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This oak frame timber has many similarities to Perth07. In view of the relatively close spatial and chronological contexts within which they were found, both may be parts of the same vessel. The seating for the keel, as with Perth07, is 90 mm wide, while a similar 30-mm limber-hole is present. If they are from the same hull then the limber-holes, which must have been located along the same side of the keel to permit a free run of water, provide a relative orientation. This suggests that the two frames may come from towards the opposite ends of the vessel. Scale 50 cm. (Cat No 88/A12563)
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Top view of claw thole (see Perth 05-06). (Cat No 84/A6085)
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Reverse side of upright thole (Perth03). Overall length 76 cm. (Cat No 269/A05–0224)
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