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Archaeology Notes

Event ID 772990

Category Descriptive Accounts

Type Archaeology Notes

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/event/772990

NO01NW 21 02081 16121

(Location cited as NO 021 161). Fieldwalking organised by Perth Museum and Art Gallery and Dunning Parish Historical Society on the site of this large oval cropmark enclosure resulted in the find of a small sherd of Late Neolithic or Early Bronze Age pottery from within the enclosure. The sherd shows a clean break suggesting that that it was the result of recent damage by the plough.

Flint and fieldwalking archive held by Perth Museum and Art Gallery (Acc. No: 1993.1094).

M D King 1993.

Aerial photographs (RCAHMSAP 1994) have recorded the cropmarks of the discontinuous ditch of a circular enclosure, situated some 250m W of Dunning Burn. At the approximate centre of which a possible square barrow has been identified at NO c. 0207 1616, and some 150m NW of another recorded square barrow (NO01NW 66).

Slightly to the SE of the enclosure lies a group of pits, and to the NE a second smaller enclosure has also been identified (NO01NW 22). Further cropmarks related to settlement activity are also visible in the area.

Information from RCAHMS (JH) 28 January 1998.

Scheduled (with NO01NW 22, NO01NW 33, NO01NW 36, NO01NW 39, NO01NW 40, NO01NW 55, NO01NW 56, NO01NW 66, NO01NW 68, NO01NW 131, NO01NW 134, NO01NW 141, NO01NW 142, NO01NW 143 ) as Leadketty, enclosures, ring-ditches, square barrow and pits.

Information from Historic Scotland, scheduling document dated 23 February 2001.

(Listed as possible causewayed enclosure). This plough-levelled enclosure is almost circular on plan. It was discovered during aerial reconnaissance by CUCAP in 1971, and fieldwalking has recovered Neolithic pottery from the surface.

A Oswald, C Dyer and M Barber 2001.

People and Organisations

References