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Aberdeen, Union Street, East and West Church of St Nicholas General view.

SC 537324

Description Aberdeen, Union Street, East and West Church of St Nicholas General view.

Date c. 1900

Collection General Collection

Catalogue Number SC 537324

Category On-line Digital Images

Copy of AB 5044

Scope and Content St Nicholas Church, Union Street, Aberdeen Founded before 1151, St Nicholas was one of the largest medieval burgh churches in Scotland. The late 12th-century transepts and crossing known as the Drum and Collison Aisles and the 15th-century crypt known as St Mary's Chapel survive. After the Reformation the church was split into two parts. To the left is the West Kirk of 1755, designed by James Gibbs and to the right is the East Kirk of 1834-7 by Archibald Simpson. The central tower and spire were rebuilt in 1874 after a fire. The entrance is via the south transept known as the Drum Aisle, one of the surviving parts of the medieval church. Source: RCAHMS contribution to SCRAN.

Permalink http://canmore.org.uk/collection/537324

File Format (TIF) Tagged Image File Format bitmap

Collection Hierarchy - Item Level

Collection Level (551 359) General Collection

Group Level (551 359/3) PHOTOGRAPHS

>> Sub-Group Level (551 359/3/1) Thomas Polson Lugton

>>> Item Level (SC 537324) Aberdeen, Union Street, East and West Church of St Nicholas General view.

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Attribution & Licence Summary

Attribution: © Courtesy of Historic Environment Scotland (Thomas Polson Lugton Collection)

Licence Type: Educational

You may: copy, display, store and make derivative works [eg documents] solely for licensed personal use at home or solely for licensed educational institution use by staff and students on a secure intranet.

Under these conditions: Display Attribution, No Commercial Use or Sale, No Public Distribution [eg by hand, email, web]

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