Loch Tay, Priory Island

Barmkin, Crannog (possible), Priory

Site Name Loch Tay, Priory Island

Classification Barmkin, Crannog (possible), Priory

Alternative Name(s) Eilean Nam Ban; Sybilla's Island; Isle Of Loch Tay

Canmore ID 24932

Site Number NN74NE 5

NGR NN 76634 45372

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Ordnance Survey licence number 100020548. All rights reserved.
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Administrative Areas

  • Council Perth And Kinross
  • Parish Kenmore (perth And Kinross)
  • Former Region Tayside
  • Former District Perth And Kinross
  • Former County Perthshire

Archaeology Notes

NN74NE 5 76634 45372

Dixon describes this, the largest island in Loch Tay, as being 'at least superficially of artificial construction'; it comprises 'medium to large boulders', measures about 70m by 50m and is oval on plan. The island is mentioned in 1122-4 when it was granted by Alexander I to the monks of Scone Abbey as the burial-place of Queen Sybilla; the priory was probably built during this period. Later maps indicate that this was the 'yle de Kenmor' that was the residence of the Earl of Strathearn in 1306. In the mid 15th century the island was fortified by the construction of a barmkin wall, in 1509 the priory was re-built after its destruction by fire and in 1654 General Monk successfully besieged the island.

OSA 1796; NSA 1845; J Stuart 1866; F O Blundell 1913; W A Gillies 1938; G E Oakley 1973; T N Dixon 1983; I Morrison 1985.

A summary of the work carried out by the Scottish Trust for Underwater Archaeology in 2004 is included in The University of Edinburgh's 50th Annual Report, 2004.

N Dixon 2004

Architecture Notes


Loch Tay Priory.

National Library of Scotland.

The National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh, contains among the 'uncatalogued MSS of General Hutton', numbered 124, Vol.1, a South-West view dated 1789 of this Priory.



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