Doune, Roman Fort And Annexe

Fort Annexe (roman)(possible), Roman Fort (roman), Amphora (roman), Bead (roman), Blade (roman), Bottle (roman), Bracelet (roman), Brooch (roman), Coin (roman), Crucible (roman), Harness Fitting (roman), Nail (roman), Organic Material (roman), Pot (roman), Quern (roman), Slag (roman), Sling Shot (roman), Unidentified Pottery (roman), Vessel (roman), Whetstone (roman)

Site Name Doune, Roman Fort And Annexe

Classification Fort Annexe (roman)(possible), Roman Fort (roman), Amphora (roman), Bead (roman), Blade (roman), Bottle (roman), Bracelet (roman), Brooch (roman), Coin (roman), Crucible (roman), Harness Fitting (roman), Nail (roman), Organic Material (roman), Pot (roman), Quern (roman), Slag (roman), Sling Shot (roman), Unidentified Pottery (roman), Vessel (roman), Whetstone (roman)

Alternative Name(s) Castle Hill; Castle Of Doune; Doune Roman Fort; Doune Primary School

Canmore ID 24767

Site Number NN70SW 36

NGR NN 7273 0130

NGR Description Centred NN 7272 0130

Datum OSGB36 - NGR

Ordnance Survey licence number 100020548. All rights reserved.
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Administrative Areas

  • Council Stirling
  • Parish Kilmadock
  • Former Region Central
  • Former District Stirling
  • Former County Perthshire

Archaeology Notes

centred 7272 0130

'Aerial reconnaissance in 1983 located a Roman fort on Castle Hill between the town and the Castle of Doune overlooking a covenient crossing-place on the river Teith.

Final excavation has confirmed that the fort was guarded on the E by a triple-ditch system whose terminals curved inwards in a form characteristic of Flavian structures elsewhere in N Britain. Its size

is probably not more than 2.6ha with in the ditches, but the position of the western defences has still to be confirmed. The site, which appears to have undergone a single period of occupation, may indicate the place at which the main Roman road from the isthmus to the north crossed into Caledonia.'

G S Maxwell 1984.

Further aerial reconnaissance shows that over the ramparts the dimensions of this fort are c 160m NE-SW by 140m, an area of 2.25ha (5.6 acres). A crop-mark extending from the W angle towards the River Teith may indicate an annexe. (Information from G S Maxwell).

S S Frere 1985.

For newspaper accounts of discovery see under 'Archaeological Organisations - RCAHMS' (File of newscuttings etc)

(Undated) information in NMRS.

NN 727 013 An archaeological excavation was undertaken in the playing fields of Doune Primary School, which is located within the site of Doune Roman fort. The intervallum way was identified in the form of a gravel-built road. The complete ground plans of two buildings were recovered as well as the partial foundations of several others. These may represent the hospital block. Several large pits were identified and excavated; it is likely that these formed part of the demolition of the fort once it went out of commission. Five bread ovens were identified, built into the back of the rampart. Pottery associated with the investigated features appears to date to the 1st century AD. This conforms with the Flavian date previously attributed to the site.

Sponsor: Stirling Council.

C Moloney 1999.

Scheduled as 'Doune Roman Fort... 60m S of Doune Primary School... the buried remains of a Roman fort, visible from the air as cropmarks...'

Information from Historic Scotland, scheduling document dated 26 April 2011.

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